A Dalton Family From Yorkshire, England Comes to America

 

Researched, complied and edited by Rodney G. Dalton

 

For many years hundred's of Dalton researchers have been trying to make a connection of the Eastern States Dalton's to the Dalton's in England.

 

I will give a pedigree that shows where a Dalton man from the Dalton Lancashire line went to Yorkshire and thus is the Yorkshire line of Dalton's. I will also give what some researchers have said is the link to this Dalton Yorkshire family to the Eastern United States Dalton's.

 

This report is in a genealogy pedigree format and you will read the histories of Dalton's in each generation.

 

(Disclaimer) What I have found during my research is that the most difficult part of Genealogy is how to document the information I found. And, even more important, was how to evaluate a particular sources’ accuracy. Thirty years ago, it was much simpler, because most of the information you found was ‘published’, usually in book form, and this is easy to document. In today‘s world, with the Internet, there are genealogies all over the place and many are not documented at all. So the obvious question most people will ask, "Is where did all the information come from?"

 

This is not easy to answer. First off, I must apologize to all the persons, living and dead, who I have shamelessly copied from, without giving the proper credit. Originally, I started by adding information from the ―"John Dalton Book of Genealogy" and while looking for my ancestors, I started to add other names from other sources and have never stopped.

From this basic information, I have used every source I could find to confirm, modify, add to and refine my Dalton family database of information. One of the first problems I found was that many sources contradicted each other. My philosophy was to compare, combine and adjust the information in each to match whatever historical documents I could find - such as Wills, birth announcements, marriage listing, and census lists. So that now, much of the information in my book comes from a combination of sources. Many details come from other genealogies that I found either on the Internet, or at Historical Societies.

 

You will also notice that I have done little traditional 'source documenting' for my information. I am sure I will get my '20 lashes' from Traditional Genealogists'. I would just like to take a minute to defend my actions. First, I am guilty of both being naive and of being lazy. I initially did not think of ever publishing this book, and so did not know how, nor did I attempt to educate myself on how to properly document my information. So, I initially listed sources to my original documentation. But as I learned that I should be documenting everything, I discovered that this was not necessarily of any special use to me in my work. Just because I found something in one source‘ did not mean it was correct, nor did the source‘ tell me where 'he' got the information from. Other historical genealogists do not list for every person, and every birth, death, marriage, maiden name, etc. where they received the information. They would just list it, and you would have to judge for yourself whether the information was accurate or not. I would like you to look at my Dalton information in the same way.

What I have done, is when I found an original piece of documentation, such as a census listing, a marriage listing, a cemetery listing or headstone transcription, Last Will and Testament, etc., I have noted that information in my 'sources'. I will also note when I find a source that contradicts other information I have found and I will sometimes arbitrarily decide which source I will 'accept' as most accurate. For some of my entries, you will probably not see any 'sources'. This means that the information was found on someone's family genealogy, and there was no 'original source' mentioned. My assumption is that if someone took the time to publish something, or add it to their genealogy, I will accept it as truthful, until I find information to the contrary, at which time I will try to find some original sources to help me decide which information is more accurate.

Rodney G. Dalton -2009.

 

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How the Dalton in Yorkshire connects to the Lancashire Daltons is through a man named John Dalton, who is listed, "of Dalton, Bispham & Croston, Lancashire, England" and died in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England. He was from the line of Yorkshire Dalton's that went back to Sir Robert Dalton, born 1386. He was the third son of this Sir Richard Dalton. There are early connections also that needs to have further research done.

 

One source of (many) the connection for the Yorkshire Daltons to the Eastern States and Virginia Dalton's is to be found in a book by Lucy Henderson Horton. I have researched this using my Dalton family database and from pedigrees from the internet. I take full responsibility of this to be as correct as I can make it. (Read at the disclaimer about this Lucy Horton at the end of this text.)

 

The question is this; further on in the text you will read about Sir William Dalton, born in 1629 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England. Did in fact, two of his boys, William & John migrate to America as stated by Lucy Henderson. But again more research is needed to prove this. (Go to page 66 and read a disclaimer)

Before we read excerpts from this book by Lucy Henderson Horton I have added the pedigree of this John Dalton of Yorkshire from my database.

 

Descendants of John Dalton

 

Generation No. 1

 

1. John Dalton was born Abt. 1445 in of Dalton, Bispham & Croston, Lancashire, England, and died 10 Sep 1458 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England. He married Joan.

 

The following is a document stored in the Public Records Office, Kew England. Under the title: Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office. Early proceedings, Richard Ii to Phillip and Mary.

 

"John Dalton, of Kingston upon Hull, son of Robert Dalton. v. Thomas Cooke and William Morcell, executors of the said Robert: Detention of deeds relating to messuages and gardens in Beverley, York".

 

Kingston upon Hull is situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary at the mouth of its tributary, the River Hull. The valley of the River Hull has been inhabited since the early Neolithic period but there is little evidence for a substantial settlement in the area where the town of Kingston upon Hull was sited. The situation was attractive to its early developers because of its ability to give access to a prosperous hinterland and navigable rivers, but the actual site was not as good as it was remote and low lying with no fresh water. It was originally an outlying part of the hamlet of Myton when, in the late 12th century, it was chosen by the monks of Meaux Abbey to develop as a new town which they named Wyke upon Hull after John Wyke, Archbishop of York. The locals flatly refused to call their town Wyke, and used Hull, the name of the river, instead.

 

This above record proves that there is in fact a link from the Lancashire Dalton's to the Yorkshire Dalton's.

 

The family of DALTON is proved by Dugdale's Visitation (1666) to have been settled at Kingston-upon-Hull many years prior to going into Richmondshire.

 

 

The Yorkshire Dalton family were well established in Kingston-upon-Hull by the middle of the fifteenth century.

 

The family were merchants of the staple (the staplers traded in wool and h ad their chief office at Calais) and must have been both prominent and prosperous, for, as early as 1487, John Dalton was elected Mayor. The city h ad been founded in the reign of Edward I and the first mayor was appointed in 1332.

 

All through the sixteenth century the family kept on producing the Chief Citizen; several of them serving twice or thrice over a period of years, of ten holding the office of Sheriff before being elected Mayor. One of the m, Thomas, an Alderman and Merchant, was also very holy. By his will dated 1497 (the year Cabot sailed to Newfoundland and Labrador) Mae founded a Chantry in Holy Trinity Church. He also left his house near the Church to the table-priests and their successors, and gave them his "great picture of beyond sea work which cost him 8 pounds sterling to set up over the Altar of St. Corpus Christi in the Church." And he asked to be buried on the north side of the aisle.

 

The family's activities as Mayor, however, were not always plain sailing. In 1540, King Henry VIII visited Hull on his way to meet his nephew, James V of Scotland, at York, and, after being suitably entertained, he left for that city. Meanwhile, the election for Mayor was due, and the candidates were Mr. Dalton and Mr. Johnson. Alas! before the votes were cast, he King unexpectedly returned; the election was postponed and the candidates went to meet him. When he heard about the election, Henry ordered the Corporation to meet again and mentioned that Sir John Eland should be nominated along with the other two. At the election, the King voted for Sir John, and of course the latter was elected. I suspect that democracy was but skin-deep in those days, and in any case it was discreet not to tort a Tudor monarch.

 

Another Dalton, Thomas, during the first of his three mayoralties, was in office in 1554 when a rich citizen called Sir William Knowles presented the Corporation with a gold chain weighing 41/2 ounces upon condition that the Mayor should wear it every Sunday, holiday, and on

particular occasions or else forfeit 40 pence for every omission. This story has a sequel. The chain, presumably first worn by Thomas Dalton in 1554, is still the basis of the chain worn by contemporary Lord Mayors of Hull, and was worn when the writer, l0th in descent from Thomas, during his year as High Sheriff of Yorkshire, entertained the Lord Mayor of Hull to luncheon at the Assizes.

 

The last Dalton to be Mayor, in 1588, was Robert, and I am sorry to say he brought discredit on this family. He was accused later of having "engrossed most of the mills in his hands, taking (instead of money) moultercorn, and more of it than he should, and aggravated his offence by mixing plaster with it to increase the weight." For this grave offence he was severely reprehended" and might well have been fined too had he not apologized and promised never to repeat the crime. Honesty compels me to record this blot; family pride makes me add that the culprit was not a direct ancestor of the present Dalton line:

 

By the end of the sixteenth century, the family was ready to expand its life away from the channels of commerce. For some time they had married in to the families of the landed gentry, and had been well educated. In particular, William Dalton, second son of that Thomas who had three times been Mayor, became a lawyer and was Recorder of Hull. He then moved and sett led at or near Otley in the West Riding of Yorkshire. He was made a member of the Council of the North at York, was subsequently (in the language of the period) Attorney-General of the Northern Court, which probably meant secretary to the Council in modern terms - and became also Recorder of York. His office was at The King's Manor in York, which is still in existence and is now part of York University. He was knighted by King Charles I at Whitehall Palace in 1629. A few years later we find his signature on a letter from the Council to the Mayor and Aldermen of Hull about the fortifications of the town and the payment for them: I hope it gave him satisfaction to take some part in the affairs of his native place. It is not known when he was born, but he died in 1649, a staunch but doubtless saddened Royalist, and was buried in York Minster. There is a portrait of him, as an old man, at Hauxwell Hall. It was in 1631 that he h ad bought Hauxwell for his son John, of whom more in a moment

 

Before finally leaving Hull, it may be of interest to quote from an eighteenth century History of the town concerning the duties of Mayor in the earliest days, to show that the holders of that office were persons of consequence and had heavy responsibilities.

 

"During his year of office he is to see the laws executed, and the King within his district exercises his authority by the Mayor's administration, so that he is the King's Lieutenant in his absence. The Mayor of Hull gives place and drops the insignia of authority only to the Sovereign himself or the presumptive Heir to the Crown, in the presence of whom only he is dispossessed and on such occasions carries himself the mace before the King."

 

In 1631 the 'manors' of West and East Hauxwell and half the advowson was conveyed to Sir William Dalton, kt., third son of Thomas Dalton, Mayor of Hull in 1569. Sir William, who was one of the Council of the North, died in 1649, leaving a son John Dalton, of Hauxwell, lieutenant colonel in the king's army, and mortally wounded while escorting the queen from Bridlington to Oxford in 1646. His son William, knighted at the Restoration, was buried at Hauxwell in 1675, and succeeded by his son Marmaduke, knighted in the year following, who was drowned in 1680. His three daughters were Grace, who died in childhood, Elizabeth, who obtained Hauxwell as her share of the inheritance, and Mary, who married Edward Graham Viscount Preston. Elizabeth bequeathed her moiety to her uncle Sir Charles Dalton, who died unmarried before 1747, and was succeeded first by his nephew Charles, son of his brother Darcy, and afterwards by Francis younger brother of Charles.

 

http://www.lorelei.org.uk/neantfamily/neuadd_drummau_nursing_home.jpg

Present day Hawkswell Hall

 

 

More information about Hauxwell or Hawkswell:

 

From this family they were acquired in 1631 by Sir William Dalton for his son John, who thus became "First of Hauxwell" for our family. John had married Dorothy D'Arcy of Horn by Castle near Bedale and only three miles from Hauxwell. The house at this date was small and simple and John was perhaps some sort of agent for t he D'Arcys. He was certainly "of their party" politically and shortly became second-in- command of his brother-in-law's troop of Royalist horse. (Several pieces of armor of the period are still to be seen in the muse um at Hauxwell). The family's Hull origins were kept in mind by the inclusion in a window of Hauxwell Church of an heraldic shield of sixteenth century painted glass depicting Dalton impaling Tyrwhitt. Ann Tyrwhitt had be en the second wife of Thomas Dalton of Hull and was John Dalton's grandmother.

 

Whatever plans John, with his wife Dorothy, may have had as squire of Hauxwell, were shattered by the Civil War. John took service with his brother- in-law D'Arcy, and in 1643 they were assigned the duty of escorting the Queen, Henrietta Maria, on her journey across England. The Queen had landed at Bridlington on the Yorkshire coast in February, and after a del ay in York began the hazardous cross-country journey to join the King at Oxford. She arrived there in July, but regrettably John Dalton was no longer with her. At the crossing of the River Trent at Burton, there was a skirmish with the Parliamentary troops; John was badly wounded. He was taken back to Yorkshire where he died a year later and was buried in York Minster. This melancholy event was recorded by his father, Sir William, in his own handwriting on one of the fly-leaves of his law manual still at Hauxwell.

 

"My only sonne John Dalton was wounded at Burton upon Trent the fifth of July 1643 and thereof dyed 1644 the 24 of July who was a valiant man and a duetyfull and lovinge sonne." Would not any of us be satisfied with such a simple and moving epitaph?

 

One can imagine the disruption and distress caused by the Civil War, with allegiance divided even within families. Yet things soon returned to normal, and after his restoration, Charles II, now King, remembered those whose families had loyally supported his parents. John's son William was o ne of those knighted by Charles II. This second Sir William lived at Hauxwell and before he died had begun to enlarge the house. So far as is known, no celebrated architect was employed, but the work attributed to this period is typically restrained and eminently suitable for a squire's house.

 

The Daltons continued in the male line all through the l8th century when t heir most important member was Sir Charles, younger son of the second Sir William. He had been born in 1660 and in middle life obtained some min or appointment as an Usher at the Court in London. Here he mixed with fashionable and cosmopolitan people and acquired knowledge (and possessions) which were to influence Hauxwell permanently. It was in 1717 that he be came the owner of the property, succeeding a niece who was unmarried and w ho had got into financial difficulties. Having "bailed her out", he took over the property and commemorated the event by erecting a stone obelisk in front of his house. This monument stood sturdily for nearly 250 years before being severely damaged in the great gale which ravaged this part of Yorkshire in 1962. It has since been repaired.

 

Sir Charles never married. In 1727 he became Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, a position of some consequence in those days, which he held till his death twenty years later. During this time he built a wing to the house, the ground floor being a beautifully proportioned room decorated with carved wood panels and plaster work, and imported some notable pieces of Flemish tapestry which family tradition believes he "acquired" from the palace of Westminster: He also collected books, many of which have survive d, as has also his court dress sword and a part of his black rod.

 

After Sir Charles's death in 1747 the property passed through a somewhat twilight period. For more than forty years his parson nephew, another Charles, was in possession and must have planted trees near the house where so me very fine hard-wood specimens still stand. He in his turn was succeeded for a short time by his brother Francis. This brother had married a lady who was related to the Bathurst family and who inherited some family portraits as well as a house in Kent. This house was sold and the proceeds used to enlarge the Hauxwell estate. Francis and his wife had an only daughter who married into a distinguished local family called Gale and lived to be 55 years old. Her grand-daughter, who inherited Hauxwell, took the additional name of Dalton to her married name of Wade. After three generations of Wade-Daltons, the last of that line, being childless, gave the estate to his distant kinsman, Richard Dalton, born 1948, whose direct ancestor had bought it over 300 years previously.

 

The Dugdale's visitation of Yorkshire gives the following pedigree of this Dalton family:

 

 

l. _____ DALTON, had issue-

 

John Dalton (II)

William Dalton.

 

Of note: This blank name is probably Robert Dalton because of the following item.

 

" The following is a document stored in the Public Records Office, Kew England.

Under the title: Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office. Early proceedings, Richard II to Phillip and Mary.

 

"John Dalton, of Kingston upon Hull, son of Robert Dalton. v. Thomas Cooke and William Morcell, executors of the said Robert.: Detention of deeds relating to messuages and gardens in Beverley.: York".

 

This must prove that there is in fact a link from the Lancashire Dalton 's to the Yorkshire Dalton's.

 

II. JOHN DALTON, of Hull, buried at Trinity Church there. died 11 Sept. 1458. Will 9 Sept., proved, 20 Oct. 1458. Married Joan ______ (remarried first John Whitfield, Mayor of Hull; secondly, Sir Richard York, M.P. Took t he vow of celibacy. Will 20 Aug. 1506. They had issue;

 

1. Thomas, of Hull, merchant, Sheriff 1484, Mayor 1489 and 1499. Will 15 June 1497, proved at York 4 Jan. 1502-3, to be buried at Trinity Church ; married Elizabeth ___ who administered her husband's estate.

 

2. John

3. Robert, buried with their father at Trinity Church.

4. William,

5. Elizabeth, named in her brother John's will.

 

JOHN DALTON, of Hull, merchant, Sheriff 1482, Mayor 1487 and 1495, died 10 Aug. 1494 and buried at Trinity Church, Hull. Will 12 Oct. 1487, proved at York 7 Sept. 1496. Marr. Catherine, daughter of Robert Alcock, merchant, Hull, niece of John Alcock, Bishop of Ely (remarried Robert Herrison, merchant, Hull), to be buried at Trinity Church. Will 13 May 1541, proved at York 13 July 1545. They had issue nine sons and four daughters.

 

1. William, named in his father's fill.

2. Robert, named in his father's and mother's wills, of Hull, Alderman and Merchant, buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 10 Apr. 1578. Will 7 Apr., pr. 7 July 1578 at York; married, Elizabeth, daughter and heir. of _____Silleston, buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 1 Feb. 1587- 8. They had issue;

 

1. Robert, named in his father's and grand- father's will.

2. Thomas, named in his grandfather's will.

3. Edward, named in his father's and grandfather's wills.

4. William, named in their father's will.

5. Barbara,

6. Emme,

7. Marie, named in her grandfather's will.

 

3. Thomas (IV).

4. Edward, named in his mother's will. Had issue;

1. Katherine.

5. John.

6. Anthony.

7. Elizabeth, named in her father's will.

8. Agnes, named in her mother's will.

9. Jennet, named in her mother's will.

 

IV. THOMAS DALTON, of Hull, merchant, Mayor 1547. Will 18 Aug., pr. at York 1 Oct. 1556, to be buried in Trinity Church, Hull; Marr. _______, daughter of ___________Wilkinson. They had issue;

 

1. John, of Hull, eldest son, named in his father's will, Had issue;

1. William.

2. John, named in their grandfather's will.

3. Thomas, named in their grandfather's will.

 

3. Thomas (V).

 

4. Edward, named in his father's will. Will 8 June 1567, proved 6 Oct. 15 75 ; married, Mary ____ They had issue;

1. Edward,

2. Thomas,

3. William,

4. Joan, named in their father's will.

5. Katherine,

6. Maude,

7. Elizabeth,

8. All named in their father's will.

 

V. THOMAS DALTON, of Sutton in Holderness. Merchant of the Staple and Adventurer, Mayor 1554, 1560 and 1569. Buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 6 Jan. 1590. Will 30 Dec. 1590, proved at York 10 Dec. 1591. Married, firs t, Ann Walker. Married, secondly, Anne, dau. of Sir Robert Tirwhit, of Kettleby, in co. Linc. Knt. They had issue;

 

I. Robert of Swyne in Holderness.

2. Sir William (VI).

3. Philip, had lands in his father's will.

4. Edward, of Sutton, gent. Will 6 Jan, 1617-8, proved at York 17 Ju ly 1618, to be buried at

Sutton Church; married ____ They had issue;

William,

Elizabeth,

Anne, named in their father's will.

Luce,

Frances, named in their father's will.

 

 

5. Thomas, had lands in his father's will.

 

Anne, marr. Sir Ralph Ellerke, son and heir of Edward Ellerker, of Risby.

Elizabeth, married. Walter Cave.

Susannah, executrix of her father's will, under which she had lands.

 

VI. SIR WILLIAM DALTON, of the city of Yorke, and one of King's Concell in his court there for the Northern parts, died in 1649, knighted at Whitehall 28 Apr. 1629, buried 25 Jan. 1649-50 at York Minster. Married Theophania, daughter of John Boothe, of Killingholme, in co. Linc., widow of Thomas Agard (Agar), marriage lic. 1598, buried at Holy Trinity Church,

Goodramgate, York, 18 Feb. 1601. Will 17 Oct. 1605, proved at York 28 Apr. 1 606. They had issue;

 

John (VII).

 

Anne, wife of Marmaduke grimrton, of Grimston- Garth, in Holdernes.

Mary, died unmarried, buried at Belfreys, 10 Apr. 1624.

 

VII. JOHN DALTON of Hawkeswell, died in 1646, at Newark Castle, of wounds received at Burton- on-Trent while conducting the Queen from York towards London. Baptised at Belfreys 17 Sept. 1603, buried 26 July 1644 at York Minster. Will 9 Aug. 1643, proved at York 15 Jan. 1645-6; married Doro thy, daughter of Conyers, Lord Darcy and Conyers, of Hornby Castle. They h ad issue;

 

1. Sir William Dalton VIII.

2. Thomas Dalton, of Yorke and Bedale, named in his father's will. Will 19 July 1710; marr. Ann Wyvill, daughter of Sir Marmaduke Wywill, of Constable Burton, Kt, and Bart., buried 28 Nov. 1675 at Bedale (a quo Dalton of Slenningford; see Dalton's Wrays of Glentworth," and " Burke's Commoners,"

3. Marmaduke, named in his father's will.

4. Mary, wife of John Beverley, of Smeton.

5. Barbara, wife of Charles Tanleard, of Arden.

6. Ursula, named in her father's will.

 

VIII. SIR WILLIAM DALTON of Hawkeswell, Knt. 19 Aug. 1665. Died 23 Mar. 16 75, buried at Hawkswell, Married Elizabeth, daughter of Marmaduke Wyvill, of Constable Burton. They had issue;

 

1. Sir Marmaduke (IX).

2. Christopher, died unmarried.

3. Sir Charles, of Hawkswell, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, died unmarried 16 Aug.

1747, at Hawkswell.

4. Darey (X).

5. Thomas, buried at York Minster 9 Jan. 1692 (Skaife). Michaell, buried at York Minster

7 Nov. 1682.

6. Isabell, married Roger Crofte, of East Appleton, d. 25 Feb. 168 4, bur. at Catterick.

7. Dorothy, marr. at York Minster 1 March 1689-90, Dr. William Stainforth, Canon

Residentiary of York, buried in York Minster 17 Apr. 1707.

8. Elizabeth.

9. Ursula, married Sir Barrington Bourchier, of Beningborough, Knt.

 

IX. SIR MARMADUKE DALTON, of Hawkswell, Knt., 19 Aug. 1665. Drowned at Dalton Bridge 19 Feb. 1680, buried at Hawkswell. Married Barbara, daughter of Henry Belasyse, son and heir of Lord Fauconberg. Died 12 Sept. 1708, age sixty-three, buried at Hawkswell. They had issue;

 

1.Grace, died Yorke, age twelve.

2. Mary, marr. in York Minster 5 Jan. 1703-4 ,to Edward Graham, Viscount Preston.

3. Elizabeth, died unmarried. Left half the estate, including Hawkswell, to Sir Charles Dalton.

 

X. DARCY DALTON, M.A., Rector of Aston, matric. 25 Oct. 1712, Prebendary of York, died 27 March 1734, age sixty-four, buried at Aston. Marri ed first, Mary Harrison, of Skellow, at York Minster, 25 Sept. 1701, buried at Owston 6 Feb. 1703-4. They had issue;

 

1. Darcy Dalton, living 1739, died unmarried.

 

Married secondly, Jane _____ died 5 March 1719, age thirty-six, buried at Aston. They had issue;

 

1. Charles Dalton, Rector of Hawkswell, succeeded his uncle Sir Charles, died unmarried intestate 22 Dec. 1788, age seventy-five, buried at Hawkswell.

2. William, died unmarried.

3. Francis (XI).

4. Barbara, marr. Charles Tancred, of Arden. Married Gilbert Knowle r, D.D.

5. Elizabeth, married Samuel Drake, Rector of Treeton and Holme on Spaldingmore, died 3 Nov. 1792 at Hawkswell.

6. Jane, died 5 Feb. 1729, age fifteen, buried at Aston.

 

XI. FRANCIS DALTON, of Hawkswell, sometime in the Six, Clerks' Office, died 21 Nov. 1792, age seventy-four, buried at Hawkswell. Married. Mary, daughter of John Tasker, of Wimbleton. They had issue;

 

Mary Dalton, only child and heiress; unmarried Henry Gale, Esq., of Scruton, at St. Andrew's, Holborn, 3 Apr. 1779.

     

Children of John Dalton and Joan are:

 

i.    Thomas Dalton, born in Hull, Yorkshire, England; died 1503. He married Margaret Swattock.

 

 

 

Vol. 1 page 81 - (Victoria County History)

Thomas Dalton d.1503) asked for services to be sung for his soul by all the priests of the table at Holy Trinity, Hull, accompanied by the ringing of the great bell, and in addition after his wife's death "the bellman to go about the town after the custom"

 

Vol. 1 page 141 - (Victoria County History)

 

Thomas Dalton of Hull (d.1503) was also a Calais Stapler, trading in wool, cloth and lead.

 

ii.   John Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England; died 10 Aug 1496

iii.  Robert Dalton.

iv.  William Dalton.

v.   Elizabeth Dalton.

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. John Dalton was born in Yorkshire, England, and died 10 Aug 1496. He married Katherine Alcock, daughter of Robert Alcock. She was born in Yorkshire, England, and died 1541.

 

JOHN DALTON, of Hull, merchant, Sheriff 1482, Mayor 1487 and 1495, died 10 Aug. 1494 and buried at Trinity Church, Hull. Will 12 Oct. 1487, proved at York 7 Sept. 1496.

John Dalton was Sheriff in 1452 and Mayor of Kingston-upon-Hull in 1487 and 1495. He was MP in the Parliament of 1485-6.

 

Vol. 1 page 54 - 1488 (Victoria County History)

John Dalton (d.1496), mayor of Hull, was appointed commissioner of the Humber (acting as admiral)

 

Vol. 1 page 84 - (Victoria County History)

Agnes (d.1459) wife of John Bedford, merchant of Hull, had previously married 2 other merchants, Richard Dalton of Hull and John Strother (? of Newcastle). Catherine, the daughter of Robert Alcock (d. 1484) merchant of Hull married first John Dalton merchant (d. 1496) and then Robert Harrison merchant. The Dalton merchants of Hull were related to those of York.

 

John Dalton married Catherine, dau. of Robert Alcock, merchant, Hull, niece of John Alcock, Bishop of Ely (remarried Robert Herrison, merchant, Hull), to be buried at Trinity Church. Will 13 May 1541, proved at York 13 July 1545. They had issue nine sons and four daughters.

 

From the Book - "Sketches of Old Hull" which purported to have been extracts from a family diary commenced in 1640, it is learned that "the bettermost folk" had their mansions in High Street, which is also called Hull Street, where they took up their residence and kept their coaches. Among those who lived on High Street was John Dalton, three times mayor.

 

 

 

 

1. William, named in his father's fill.

2. Robert, named in his father's and mother's wills, of Hull, Alderman and Merchant, buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 10 Apr. 1578. Will 7 Apr., pr. 7 July 1578 at York; married Elizabeth Silleston. Buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 1 Feb. 1587-8. They had issue;

 

1. Robert, named in his father's and grand- father's will.

2. Thomas, named in his grandfather's will.

3. Edward, named in his father's and grandfather's wills.

4. William, named in their father's will.

5. Barbara,

6. Emme,

7. Marie, named in her grandfather's will.

 

Children of John Dalton and Katherine Alcock are:

 

i.    Thomas Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England; died 1556.

ii.   William Dalton.

iii.  Robert Dalton, born in Hull, Yorkshire Co. England; died 10 Apr 1578 in Hull, Yorkshire Co. England.

iv.  Edward Dalton.

v.   John Dalton.

vi.  Anthony Dalton.

vii. Elizabeth Dalton.

viii. Agnes Dalton, died 1459. She married (1) John Bedford. She married (2) Richard Dalton. She married (3) John Stother.

 

ix.  Jennet Dalton.

 

Generation No. 3

 

3. Thomas Dalton was born in Yorkshire, England, and died 1556. He married Ann Wilkinson, daughter of Thomas Wilkinson.

 

THOMAS DALTON, of Hull, merchant, was Mayor in 1554. He was MP for Hull, 1 555 and 1572. He was sheriff in 1550/5. Will 18 Aug., proved at York 1 O ct. 1556, to be buried in Trinity Church, Hull; Married Maud Wilkinson. They had issue;

 

1. John, of Hull, eldest son, named in his father's will, who had issue:

 

1. William.

2. John, named in their grandfather's will.

3. Thomas, named in their grandfather's will.

 

Children of Thomas Dalton and Ann Wilkinson are:

 

i.    John Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England.

ii.   Robert Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England.

iii.  Edward Dalton.

iv.  Thomas Dalton, born Abt. 1516 in Of Sutton-In Holderness, Yorkshire, England; died 04 Jan 1591 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England.

 

Robert Dalton was born in Hull, Yorkshire Co. England, and died 10 Apr 1578 in Hull, Yorkshire Co. England. He married Elizabeth Silleston.

     

Children of Robert Dalton and Elizabeth Silleston are:

 

i.    Robert Dalton.

ii.   Thomas Dalton.

iii.  Edward Dalton.

iv.  William Dalton.

v.   Barbara Dalton.

vi.  Emme Dalton.

vii. Marie Dalton.

 

Generation No. 4

 

4. John Dalton was born in Yorkshire, England. He married Unknown.

 

Children of John Dalton and Unknown are:

 

i.    William Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England.

ii.   John Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England.

iii.  Thomas Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England.

 

Robert Dalton was born in Yorkshire, England. He married Elizabeth Silhston. She was born in Yorkshire, England.

 

Child of Robert Dalton and Elizabeth Silhston is:

 

i.    Robert Dalton, born in Yorkshire, England. He married Susan South.

 

Thomas Dalton was born Abt. 1516 in Of Sutton-In Holderness, Yorkshire, England, and died 04 Jan 1591 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England. He married (1) Ann Walker. He married (2) Anne Trywhitt Abt. 1563, daughter of Sir Tyrwhitt and Elizabeth Oxenbridge. She was born in Kettilly, Lincolnshire, England.

 

THOMAS DALTON, of Sutton in Holderness. Merchant of the Staple and Adventurer, Mayor 1554, 1560 and 1569. Buried at Trinity Church, Hull, 6 Jan. 159 0. Will 30 Dec. 1590, proved at York 10 Dec. 1591. Marr. first, Ann Walker. Marr. secondly, Anne, dau. of Sr Robert Tirwhit, of Kettleby, in co. Linc. Knt. They had issue;

 

I. Robert of Swyne in Holderness.

2. Sir William,

3. Philip, had lands in his father's will.

4. Edward, of Sutton, gent. Will 6 Jan, 1617-8, proved at York 17 Ju ly 1618, to be buried at

Sutton Church; marr. ____ They had issue;

 

1. William,

2. Elizabeth,

3. Anne, named in their father's will.

4. Luce,

5. Frances, named in their father's will.

6. Thomas, had lands in his father's will.

 

Anne, marr. Sir Ralph Ellerke, son and heir of Edward Ellerkr, of Risby.

Elizabeth, marr. Walter Cave.

 

Thomas Dalton was three times the Mayor of Kingston-upon-Hull, 1554,1560 and 1569. He also was Sherriff of Hull in 1550/51. He had a grant of Arms in the 5th year of Elizabeth, from William Flower, Norry King of Arms.

 

In Volume 5 of the DGS Journal, it is recorded the nice story that, during Thomas's time as mayor, Sir William Knowles presented the corporation of Hull with a gold chain on condition that the mayor wore it on Sundays and special occasions, paying a fine of 40 pence for every time that he failed to do so. Thomas continued the family's mercantile activities, trading mainly with low countries. He did not always observe all the formalities he should have done. In 1558 he and some other merchants were pardoned for trading in wools without a license, and then were officially authorized to continue such trading. In 1561 he was given a license to found a staple - a group of merchants with a monopoly - in England. He probably gave the government good value for this favour. In 1569 he was named as a 'commissioner of array', a post which would normally have been given to an MP only if he regularly voted as the government wished. His experience as a merchant must have served him well when, on 21 February 1576, he sat on a pariamentary committee on the butlerage and prizage of wines, that is on t he duties to be paid on wines and the valuations doubtless he faced what we would now term a conflict of interest, it being presumably to his advantage to have the duties and valuations as low as possible.

 

It was this Thomas who first seriously diversified into land holding, and laid some of the foundations of the real property held by the Hauxwell Daltons. He used his profits to acquire the manors of Doddington and Paull near Hull in 1556 (with Walter Jobson, his fellow MP for Hull in 1555 ); at Sculcoates near Hull and at Battle in Breconshire with Sir Henry Gates in 1558 (they paid over L2,000 for this which was a fortune in those days), and at Sutton in 1565. These acquisitions would have been ,not just f or financial advantage but also part of a process of furthering the gentrification of the Daltons, a process which continued into the next century when the family migrated from the Hull area to Hauxwell.

 

In 1581, Thomas was unable to attend Parliament because of illness and t he borough substituted Thomas Fleming: but the Commons later declared that this substitution was invalid, probably because there had been no proper election.

 

Thomas died on 4h January 1591 and was buried, like his forebears, in Holy Trinity, Hull. Ms will was dated 30 December 1590: it was common for people not to make wills until they sensed they were near their deathbeds - and proved in 1591.

 

Vol. 1 page 333 - 1558 (Victoria County History)

The Carthusian Priory at Hull was acquired by Sir Henry Gate and Thomas Dalton (d.1591)

Thomas Dalton (d.1591) and John Gregory left a house and garden in Hull f or the benefit of the poor.

 

Vol. 1 page 461-

Matthew St Quintin sold land in Southcoates to Thomas Dalton (d.1591) in 1 569 and the Daltons held land there until the end of the 17th century.

 

1574 Henry Curdeux sold land in Southcoates to Thomas Dalton (d.1591).

 

Vol. 1 page 468 - 1558

Sir Henry Gate and Thomas Dalton (d.1591) acquired the manor of Sculcoates. In 1560 they are said to have divided it between them, with two-thirds going to Thomas Dalton

 

Vol. 1 page 472 -

1569 Matthew St. Quintin sold land at Sutton to Thomas Dalton (d.1591). Daltons held this estate until 1700 when Thomas Dalton bequeathed one farm to his servant John Champney and the rest passed via his widow [Elizabeth] to the Witham family.

 

1574 Thomas Dalton acquired property in Sutton, Holderness from Henry Curdeux. In 1606 William Dalton acquired some more property there from John Rand and Frances Smith. The Daltons retained these interests until the 18th century. In 1701 Elizabeth Dalton gave most of this property to Benjamin Dalton of Beverley. The fraction she kept probably became part of the

Witham estates in Sutton. [Elizabeth's maiden name was Witham; after her husband Thomas Dalton's death she married Robert Dolman.] In 1734 Samuel Dalton sold the property given to Benjamin.

     

Children of Thomas Dalton and Anne Trywhitt are:

 

i.    Robert Dalton, born Abt. 1541 in Of Myton, Yorkshire Co. England; died 23 Jun 1626 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire Co. England.

ii.   Sir William Dalton, born Abt. 1542 in Kingston - Upon - Hull, Yorkshire, England; died 25 Jan 1649 in York Minster, Yorkshire Co. England.

iii.  Philip Dalton, born Abt. 154.

iv.  Edward Dalton, born Abt. 1546.

v.   Thomas Dalton, born Abt. 1548. He married Elizabeth Witham.

vi.  Anne Dalton, born Abt. 1550 in Yorkshire, England; died in . She married Sir Ralph Ellerker; born Abt. 1555 in Risby, Yorkshire, England.

 

vii. Elizabeth Dalton, born Abt. 1552; died in . She married Walter Cave.

 

viii. Susannah Dalton, born Abt. 1554.

 

Robert Dalton; He married Susan South.

 

Children of Robert Dalton and Susan South are:

 

i.    Robert Dalton.

ii.   Samuel Dalton.

iii.  Daniel Dalton.

 

Generation No. 5

 

5. Robert Dalton was born Abt. 1541 in Of Myton, Yorkshire Co. England, and died 23 Jun 1626 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire Co. England. He married (1) Elizabeth Constable. She was born Aft. 1543. He married (2) Dorothy Hilton. She was born Abt. 1543 in Yorkshire, England.

 

Vol. 1 page 122 - (Victoria County History)

The Dalton's abandoned municipal affairs at Hull after the resignation of Robert Dalton (d.1626) from the magistracy in 1602. They then featured as wealthy East Riding gentry, and one, Sir William, was King's Attorney in the North.

 

Children of Robert Dalton and Elizabeth Constable are:

 

i.    Robert Dalton.

ii.   Henry Dalton.

iii.  John Dalton.

iv.  James Dalton.

v.   Ambrose Dalton.

vi.  Anne Dalton. She married Robert Bacon 1601 in St. John's, Beverley, Yorkshire Co. England.

vii. Thomas Dalton, born Abt. 1569 in Of Myton, Yorkshire Co. England; died 1639.

 

Generation No. 6

 

6. Thomas Dalton was born Abt. 1569 in Of Myton, Yorkshire Co. England, and died 1639. He married Ann Engleby.

 

Children of Thomas Dalton and Ann Engleby are:

 

i.    James Dalton. He married Catherine Clarke.

ii.   William Dalton.

iii.  Thomas Dalton, born in Of Nuttles, Yorkshire Co. England. He married Elizabeth.

iv.  Elizabeth Dalton. She married Samuell Snawsdell.

v.   Catherine Dalton. She married Robert Dickensen.

 

Lt. Col. John Dalton was born 1599 in Of Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England, and died 20 Jul 1644 in York Minster, Yorkshire, England. He married Dorothy Conyers Darcy 22 Apr 1627 in Hornby, Yorkshire, England, daughter of Lord D'arcy and Dorothy Bellasyse. She was born 03 May 1600 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England, and died 31 Mar 1696.

 

JOHN DALTON of Hawkeswell, died in 1646, at Newark Castle, of wounds received at Burton- on-Trent while conducting the Queen from York towards London. Baptized at Belfreys 17 Sept. 1603, buried 26 July 1644 at York Minster. Will 9 Aug. 1643, proved at York 15 Jan. 1645-6; married Dorothy, daughter of Conyers, Lord Darcy and Conyers, of Hornby Castle. They had issue;

 

1. Sir William Dalton,

2. Thomas Dalton,

3. Marmaduke, named in his father's will.

4. Mary, wife of John Beverley, of Smeton.

5. Barbara, wife of Charles Tanleard, of Arden.

6. Ursula, named in her father's will.

 

Notice of death of "Captaine Daulton" from the Register of Burials in York Minster, Yorkshire Co. England.

 

John Dalton. esq., West Hawkswell, co. York, eldest son of Sir William Dalton, of York, knt., one of the Council of the North, by Theophania, daughter of John Booth, esq., of Killingholme, co. Linc. Baptized at St. Mickael's-le-Belfrey, 17 Sept., 1602. Married Dorothy, daughter of Conyers Lord Darcy of Hornby Castle. Captain Dalton died at Newark Castle, of wounds received at Burton-upon-Trent, while conducting the Queen from York towards London. In his will, dated 9 Aug., 1643, he bequeaths " to my eldest sonne, William Dalton, all my armes, armour and military furniture. "

 

John Dalton served as a Lieut. Col. under his brother-in-law, the Lord Dar cy and was mortally wounded when conducting Queen Henrietta Maria from Bridlington to Oxford at the bridge of Burton-upon-Trent,

July 5 1643.

 

Source:

 

The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal. Vol. 1.

Book 942.74 at the LDS FHL in SLC Utah.

 

John Dalton was commissioned in the army at the tender age of 15 into o ne of the new Marine regiments raised for the Spanish war. A year later h is father was dead, and what odds would have been laid against the survival of the family, vested only in young John about to go to war? Not only d id he survive, but he became the head of a family that was to proliferate through several generations.

 

John's career was remarkable, and started with five years as a second lieutenant on board S Preston of 50 guns, cruising in the East Indies and o ff the coast of Southern India. He then left the sea for the land and transferred to the East India Company's service as a captain in command of t he Grenadier company. This was in 1749. He became " a very intimate and worthy friend" (his own words, in a letter home) of Robert Clive, a friendship which lasted for life.

 

From now onwards, John saw much active service in the Company's war against the French. From 1752 he became the commander of the fortress of Trichinopoly, a key post which carried much responsibility both military and civil and which was not without excitement.

Beleaguered by the French and their native allies, the commander of the for tress was the obvious target for assassination, and this was duly attempted. The would- be assassin, however, was caught and summarily killed by t he gruesome (but effective) method of being blown from the muzzle of a gun .

 

By 1754, after nearly eleven years continuous service in the East Indies, John resigned his commission and sailed for home, having amassed a fortune of CIO,000, and still being young and healthy. The journey home by sea took six months and covered 14,000 nautical miles. He lost no time in visiting his mother, to whom he had written many tender letters over the years and who had been living at Kendal in Westmorland since her husband's death. It was on his journey north to see his mother that a charming and romantic episode took place. Having arrived at the "Bay Horse" Inn at Green Hammorton, one stage out of York on the road to the north, he stopped f or the night and occupied the only sitting-room available. Later, a coach arrived, carrying Lady Wray and her two daughters. John very naturally gave up his room to them, whereupon Lady Wray equally naturally invited him to have supper with them. He fell in love with one of the daughter s, Isabella, and married her in Ripon Minster the following year - and lived happily ever after.

 

The Church register of marriages records "John Dalton, Esq. of the parish of Hauxwell and Isabella Wray of this parish." The Wrays had a property, Sleningford, near Ripon. Some years later, John bought this from his brother-in-law, Sir Cecil Wray, and it remained in the family of his descend ants for more than 150 years. He was a notably handsome man. On his visits to his mother in Kendal, he had himself painted twice by the well-known artist, George Romney, at 2 guineas a time. Both pictures are still in the family. Later, when Romney went to London, t he price went up to 5 guineas.

 

John had several sons, the youngest, Tames, went into the Church and became Rector of Croft, in Yorkshire, for over forty years.

 

One of James's brothers, and his son, grandson, and two great-grandsons all served in the army in the Royal Artillery, and all became generals. The grandson, James Cecil, retired from the army before World War I,' and settled at The Hutts, a small property near Ripon, and not far from Slening ford. He had married Mary Caroline Barker, great grand-daughter of John Barker of Clare Priory, Suffolk, who, as a young officer, fought in the English army in 1774-6 at Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill. The Hutts was, and still is, a remote and lovely place high up on the edge of moorland country and with superb views for 30 miles over the Vale of York. There he raised his family, including the author of this article and his elder brother, Sir Charles, the latter going to live the re in his turn on retirement from the army. Both brothers, incidentally, have served their year as High Sheriff of Yorkshire. Meanwhile, the younger brother lives at Hauxwell as caretaker for one, of his sons, Richard, who, as has been noted above, had received the estate in trust while s till a child. In 1972, the wheel came full circle and Sir Charles's son,

John, married Amelia Stanley-Price in Ripon Cathedral 216 years after his great-great-great-grandfather had wed Isabella Wray in the same place.

 

A description of Hawkswell:

 

Hauxwell or Hawkswell is a small parish lying between Finghall and Catterick, and is wholly of rural character. The soil is light and gravelly, and chiefly laid down for grazing. The parish includes the townships of East Hauxwell, West Hauxwell, Barden, and Garriston, covering a total area of 4,590 acres. The townships of East and West Hauxwell comprise respectively 1,249 and 892 acres, and are valued for rating purposes at £936 and £607. The population of the former in 1881 was 95, and of the latter 4 0. The estate, which comprises the two townships, with all manorial right s, formerly belonged to the Daltons, and a stone column in the grounds in front of the hall, thus records an act of generosity of a daughter and heiress of this family; "In memory of Mrs. Eliza Dalton, daughter and o ne of the co-heiresses of Fr. Marmaduke Dalton, who, in regard to her family, restored this estate to her uncle, Fr. Charles Marmaduke Dalton,

Gentleman, Usher of the Black Rod, in the year 1717." It afterwards came into t he possession of the Gales, and on the deaths of the Misses Gale, it was inherited by their niece, the wife of Col. Hamlet Coote Wade, who, thereupon, assumed the name of Dalton, in addition to his own.

 

Just as these sheets were going to press, the newspapers announce the death of the gallant Colonel on the 8th of December, 1889, at the age of 8 0. He was a magistrate for the North Riding, and succeeded the Duke of Leeds as commander of the North York Militia.

 

The Hall is a good stone mansion, erected about the time of James I., and consists of a centre and two wings, surrounded by a well-wooded park. T he north entrance gateway to the latter bears the arms of the Dalton family.

 

The village of East Hauxwell occupies a pleasant but secluded situation on the road leading from Constable Burton to Richmond.

 

West Hauxwell consists of Hauxwell Hall, above mentioned, the rectory, two farmhouses, and two cottages.

 

Children of Lt. Dalton and Dorothy Darcy are:

 

i.    Mary Dalton. She married John Beverly 18 Jun 1637 in Mirfried; born in Of Great Smeaton; died 09 Oct 1680.

 

ii.   Ursula Dalton.

 

iii.  Sir William Dalton, born 1629 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Mar 1671 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England.

 

iv.  Thomas Dalton, born 23 Dec 1633 in Of Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 10 Jul 1710.

v.   Barbara Dalton, born 1636. She married Charles Tanleard.

vi.  Marmaduke Dalton, born 1655.

 

Generation No. 7

 

7. Sir William Dalton was born 1629 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England, and died 23 Mar 1671 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England. He married Elizabeth Wyvill, daughter of Sir Wyvill and Isabel Gascoigne. She was born in Of Constable Burton.

 

SIR WILLIAM DALTON of Hawkeswell, Knt. 19 Aug. 1665. Died 23 Mar. 1675, buried at Hawkswell, Marr. Elizabeth, daughter of Marmaduke Wyvill, of Const able Burton. They had issue;

 

Sir William Dalton lies interred in the church of Hawkeswell, where the following lines are engraven to his memory:

 

En conjux, pater, et frater, patronus, amicus

Charus, amans, cordi non temeratus idem

Non tam marmorei tumuli insignitus honore

Quam probitate homini, quam pietate deo.

 

VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES:

Vol. 1 page 75 -

 

In 1642 and 1644 Conyers d'Arcy and his wife Grace sold the manor of Yafforth to Sir William Dalton of Hauxwell and his son John. John's great grand daughter Mary married Edward Graham Viscount Preston in 1703. Mary and her sister Elizabeth and her uncle Charles Dalton sold the manor to John Brockhurst and Thomas Newsom in 1716.

 

Vol. 1 page 250 -

There are monuments in Hauxwell church to William Dalton (1671), Marmaduke Dalton (1680) and his wife Barbara (1708). The church plate includes a cup of 1704 inscribed "the gift of Mrs. Dalton 1714"

 

Children of Sir William Dalton and Elizabeth Wyvill are:

 

i.    Thomas Dalton, born in Of Bedale; died 07 Nov 1682.

 

Sir William the second, who lived at Hauxwell after the Restoration and who has already been

mentioned, had a younger brother, Thomas. Nothing is known about him except that he lived at

Bedale, a small country town a few miles east of Hauxwell. He had a son, John, equally obscure,

and this John's only son was James, who grew up to obtain a commission in the army.

 

ii.   Dorathy Dalton, died 17 Apr 1707 in York Minster, Yorkshire Co. England. She married William Stainforth 01 Mar 1689.

 

iii.  Isabell Dalton, died 25 Feb 1684.

iv.  Elizabeth Dalton.

v.   Ursula Dalton. She married Sir Barrington Bourchier 19 Apr 1692 in St. Mary Bishophill The Elder, York.

 

vi.  Michaell Dalton, died 05 Nov 1682.

 

Michaell, son of the Lady Dalton, was burye 7"' of November, 1682.

 

At the east end of the middle choir, 11 on S. side the N. great pillar, lyes a blne stone, about 2 kds long, wtil this Inscription engraven upon it:-' Michael the youngest son of Sr. William Dalton of Hawkswell, kat., lyeth here interred, who departed this life 5tb day of Nov. 1682, in the 11th year of his age.' To make room for this was a little white stone taken up & now layd in the N. Quire, yet near the other, OXL Web, ,w as this Inscription engrave' Here lyethe Elizabeth Wyvell, daughter of X'pofer Wyvell, Esqr. & Margarets his wyfe, whyche dyed the xiii. of April, in the yeare of our Lord God, 1565."

 

Lady Dalton," mother of Michael, was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Marmada ke Wyvell, bart., of Constable Burton, great-grandson of the above-mentioned Christopher and Margaret Wyvell.

John Dalton, grandfather of the above Michagl, was buried here in 1644.

Source: From the Register of Burials in York Minster.

 

vii. Sir Marmaduke Dalton, born 19 Aug 1655 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire Co. England; died 19 Feb 1680 in Dalton Bridge, Yorkshire Co. England.

 

viii. Sir Charles Dalton, born 1660 in Of Hawkswell, Yorkshire Co. England; died 16 Aug 1747 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire Co. England.

 

Sir Charles Dalton was lord of the manor of Hauxwell or Hawkswell. Hawkswell being the

Dalton families resident for many years.

 

Below is copied from the DGSJ, Vol. 5.

 

The Daltons continued in the male line all through the 18th century when their most important

member was Sir Charles, younger son of the second Sir William. He had been born in 1660 and

in middle life obtained some min or appointment as an Usher at the Court in London. Here he

mixed with fashionable and cosmopolitan people and acquired knowledge (and possessions)

which were to influence Hauxwell permanently. It was in 1717 that he became the owner of the

property, succeeding a niece who was unmarried and w ho had got into financial difficulties.

Having 'bailed her out", he took over the property and commemorated the event by erecting a

stone obelisk in front of his house. This monument stood sturdily for nearly 250 years before

being severely damaged in the great gale which ravaged this part of Yorkshire in 1962. It has

since been repaired.

 

Sir Charles never married. In 1727 he became Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, a position of

some consequence in those days, which he hold till h is death twenty years later. During this

time he built a wing to the house, the ground floor being a beautifully proportioned room

decorated with carved wood panels and plaster work, and imported some notable pieces of

Flemish tapestry which family tradition believes he "acquired" from the palace of Westminster!

He also collected books, many of which have survived, as has also his court dress sword and a

part of his black rod .

 

After Sir Charles's death in 1747 the property passed through a somewhat twilight period. For

more than forty years his parson nephew, another Char les, was in possession and must have

planted trees near the house where so me very fine hard-wood specimens still stand. He in his

turn was succeeded for a short time by his brother Francis. This brother had married a lady who

was related to the Bathurst family and who inherited some family portraits as well as a house in

Kent.

 

This house was sold and the proceeds used to enlarge the Hauxwell estate. Francis and his wife

had an only daughter who married into a distinguished local family called Gale and lived to be

95 years old. Her grand- daughter, who inherited Hauxwell, took the additional name of Dalton

to her married name of Wade. After three generations of Wade-Daltons, the last of that line,

being childless, gave the estate to his distant kinsman, Richard Dalton, born 1948, whose direct

ancestor had bought it over 300 years previously.

 

ix.  Rev. Darcy Dalton, born Abt. 1666 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire Co. England; died 30 Mar 1734 in York, England.

 

x.   William Dalton, born Abt. 1655 in Yorkshire, England; died in America.

 

xi.  John Dalton, born Abt. 1670 in Yorkshire, England; died in America.

 

(Of note is that these brother's William and John Dalton are believed to have come to American and thus started the Virginia Dalton line.)

 

Thomas Dalton was born 23 Dec 1633 in Of Bedale, Yorkshire, England, and died 10 Jul 1710. He married Ann Wyrill, daughter of Sir Wyrill and Isabell Gascoigne. She was born Abt. 1636 in Of Constable Burton, England, and died 28 Nov 1675 in Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

 

Thomas Dalton, of Yorke and Bedale, named in his father's will. Will 19 July 1710; married Ann Wyvill, daughter of Sir Marmaduke Wywill, of Constab le Burton, Kt, and Bart., buried 28 Nov. 1675 at Bedale (a quo Dalt on of Slenningford; see Dalton's Wrays of Glentworth," and " Burke's Commo ners,"

 

Child of Thomas Dalton and Ann Wyrill is:

 

i.    John Dalton, born 1675 in Of Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 1701.

 

 

 

Generation No. 8

 

Sir Marmaduke Dalton was born 19 Aug 1655 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire Co. England, and died 19 Feb 1680 in Dalton Bridge, Yorkshire Co. England. He married Barbara Belasyse 23 Feb 1677 in Chiswick, London, Middlesex Co. England. She was born 1645 in Coxwold, Yorkshire Co. England, and died 12 Sep 1708.

 

Vol. 1 page 346 - 1677 (Victory County History)

Sir Marmaduke Dalton Knight, whose mother was Elizabeth Wyvill, held the manor of Clifton-upon-Ure. His daughter and sole heiress Mary married Edward Graham Viscount Preston and sold the manor after her husband's death to John Hutton in 1735.

 

Sir Marmaduke, together with his wife Barbara, a daughter of Henry Belasyse, the eldest son of Viscount Fauconberg, is also commemorated by a rather heavy curtain tablet flanked by cherubs, erected by their daughters, Mary, who was married to Viscount Preston of Nunnington, and Elizabeth who, the inscription states simply enough, is as yet unmarried. Sir Marmaduke had drowned at Dalton Bridge in Topcliffe, in February 1680, at the early age of thirty-four. His widow survived until 1708; it was she who gave the church a silver flagon in 1689, the oldest piece of church plate still existing at Hauxwell. She also appointed her relative, Darcy Dalton, to the living in 1703.

 

SIR MARMADUKE DALTON, of Hawkswell, Knt., 19 Aug. 1665. Drowned at Dalton Bridge 19 Feb. 1680, buried at Hawkswell. Marr. Barbara, daughter of Henry Belasyse, son and heir of Lord Fauconberg. She died 12 Sept. 1708, age sixty-three, buried at Hawkswell. They had issue;

 

1. Grace, died Yorke, age twelve.

2. Mary, marr. in York Minster 5 Jan. 1703-4, to Edward Graham, Viscount, Preston.

3. Elizabeth, died unmarried., left half the estate, including Hawkswell, to Sir Charles Dalton.

 

This is where all the debate is with William Dalton:

 

William Dalton; The colonists, brothers John and William Dalton, brothers, came to America between 1685 and 1690, settling first in Gloucester county, Va. Some of this family later settled in Westmoreland county Va., before 1722, and still later we find that they shared the restless spirit of the day, some of them settling in the vicinity of Goochland county, Virginia.

 

From Abingdon Parish, Gloucester Co. Records 1680-1861: Children of William Dalton and wife, Margaret: Tyrell b. Feb. 20, 1708; Elizabeth Bapt. M ay 13, 1711; Margaret Bapt. Dec. 10, 1713; Sarah b. Oct. 11, 1716, Bap t. Oct. 12, 1716; Michael b. Sept. 1720; William b. ? m. Sarah Mynne Mar. 19, 1729.

 

Notes on William Dalton:

Birth: 1666 in Yorkshire, England

Death: 1722 in Fairfax County, Virginia

 

(Source: Early Virginia Religious Petitions, Library of Virginia)

 

The Daltons were among the early arrivals in the Piedmont region of Virginia, and I would guess that they migrated out of the Tidewater Region. The Piedmont was an area of Virginia that was undergoing rapid geographical changes. Initially, the Daltons lived within the jurisdiction of Hanover County where research is almost impossible due to the near total destruction of records during the Civil War. The part of present day Albemarle County where they lived was subsequently assigned jurisdictionally to Goochland, then to Louisa, then to Albemarle counties. To make it even more complex some Albemarle territory in the northeastern part of the County remained attached to Louisa for some years after Albemarle was formed in 1744. The boundaries were adjusted again in 1761 and this part of Louisa was assigned to Albemarle. The result of all of this was that the Daltons seemed to have been moving around in four different counties when they actually lived in the same northern region of present day Albemarle County, near the border of Orange and Green Counties.

 

I believe that William Dalton the elder, who died in 1727, and his brother John Dalton were part (if not all) of the original Daltons who immigrated from England. We may never know when William Dalton the Elder was born, but based on the age of his first born child, he must have been born prior to 1670, and it could have been much earlier. I have seen speculation that suggest his birth in Yorkshire. William Dalton the elder, married a woman named Margaret. This Margaret must have been Margaret Brockenbrough, the daughter of William Brockenbrough and Mary Newman. John Dalton, who was the brother of William Dalton the Elder, married Mary Newman Brockenbrough, the widow of William Brockenbrough on 6 May 1702. This also suggests that John Dalton was not a young man, and this could have been a second wife. But that is not known.

 

The first record of a Dalton in the Virginia County of Gloucester seems to be a 1707 record where William Dalton, the elder, bought several lots in Gloucester Town. His next appearance was in the Abingdon Parish register when his fourth through eight child was named and baptized. I believe that the first three children on this list were also children of William the elder, but were born prior to his association with the Abingdon Parish and were therefore, not part of the baptism record. To further complicate matters, we can only speculate as to when William Dalton the younger, and Timothy Dalton Sr., (my ancestor) were born. Evidence suggests the early 1690's for both. It was also in the

Abingdon Parish register that we first discover that William the elder's wife

was named Margaret. The children of William and Margaret Dalton were:

 

1. William Dalton, the younger, who was born about 1690.

2. Timothy Dalton Sr., who was my ancestor and was born about 1690

3. Samuel Dalton Sr., who was born 24 March 1699.

4. Tyrell Dalton, who was baptized 20 February 1708 or 1709.

5. Elizabeth Dalton, who was baptized 22 April 1711, and married a Noden.

6. Margaret Dalton, who was baptised10 December 1713.

7. Sarah Dalton, who was born 12 October 1716.

8. Michael Dalton, who was born 29 September 1720.

9. John Dalton, who was born in 1722, married Jemima Shaw about 1740, and

died in 1777

 

On 2 April 1721, William Dalton the elder, bought for the sum of 100 pounds,

996 acres in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, from Larkin Chew.

 

By 1727, William Dalton, the elder had died interstate (without a will) because his widow Margaret, the administrator of his estate, hired Alexander Cleveland to represent the estate in Spotsylvania County. Alexander Cleveland was the father of Elizabeth Cleveland, who married James Coffey, and Jane Cleveland who married Chesley Coffey. James Coffey was the brother of John Coffey, one of my ancestors, and Chelsey Coffey was a close relative to the brothers. Because he had died without a will, an inventory of the estate had to be filed in court, which was why Alexander Cleveland was hired. Also because he died interstate, William Dalton's estate was divided by Virginia law with 1/3 going to his widow and all the remainder to his eldest son

William. In acres, Margaret inherited 103 and William 893.

 

Margaret Dalton, the widow of William Dalton, the elder, married second, John Lister. The following is an extract from John Lister's will. John Lister of Abingdon Parish, County of Gloucester, Shipwright. Leaves to his wife Margaret all the estate which is left of Mr.William Dalton's, deceased, if she pays Michael Dalton, Margaret Dalton, and Elizabeth Noden their portion. To Michael Dalton at twenty-one, the plantation called "Half Way ouse" (House)

between York and Hampton at the expiration of Captain Tabb's lease. To Mary Noden and Benjamin Lister, the son of Mary Daley land adjoining Gloucester Town. To Richard Ambler of York County, Esq. Ex. and guardian of Benjamin Lister, land bought of Capt.William Dalton. (William the younger) This will was dated 10 January 1734. John Lister died and the will was effected 23 January 1734. It is believed that Margaret Brockenbrough Dalton Lister died about a month later.

Source:

 

BOOK: National Society of The Colonial Dames of America,

Maryland: R929.1N277a, Vol. 2.

 

First Families of Pittsylvania County, Virginia: by Lucy Henderson Horton, p.79.

 

Notes:

National Society of The Colonial Dames: Gives the name of John to this Dalton. He and several brothers settled in Westmoreland County, Virginia before 1722. The Dalton brothers prior to 1685 settled in Glochester Co., Virginia.

 

Children of William Dalton are:

 

i.    Samuel Dalton.

 

Samuel Dalton of Mayo was born about 1699, he died at their estate on t he Mayo River,

Rockingham County, Virginia, in 1803, aged 104 years, s on of William Dalton (a descendant of

Count de Alton, who went from Normandy with William the Conqueror). William,who died

before 1733, came from Yorkshire, England, about 1685 and settled in Gloucester County,

Virginia....Samuel Dalton and James Madison were intimate friends and both were members of

the Lovel Land Company which invested extensively in lands in Western Virginia and North

Carolina. He first removed to Georgia but later returned to Virginia. He was the wealthiest man

 

 

In all the Piedmont region of Virginia and North Carolina."

 

Information on Samuel Dalton marrying Ann Dandridge Redd:

 

Samuel was born abt. 1698/99 and died Jan or Feb 1807-yes he was over 100 yrs old. He died in

Stokes County, NC or Rockingham County, NC. He is buried in the Moore Family Cemetery at

the foot of Saurtown Mountain in Danbury, NC. His parents were William, b. 1679 d. 1733 and

Elizabeth, b. 1677 Dalton. Ann Dandridge Redd was b. 1718 and d. 1800.

 

The origin of Samuel Dalton is unknown in spite of numerous and long standing efforts to

discover his parents and place of birth. His earliest known appearance in Virginia occurs in

1734 when he purchased a tract of 4 00 acres in Hanover County from John Dowell. Prior to that

date, his name is not found in any source, including the parish records of Gloucester, New Kent,

or Hanover Counties. The tract of land he purchased from John Dowell lay between Priddy's

Creek and Wolf Trap Creek in the northeastern corner of present Albemarle County, Virginia. It

was not technically in Albemarle until this corner of the county was separated from Louisa

County in 1761. Before that, records for Samuel Dalton are found in Hanover County,

Goochland County, and Louisa County - the progression of county formation on this early

frontier of Virginia.

 

It was probably soon after his 1734 acquisition of 400 acres of land that he married Anne Redd.

It is believed, but cannot be definitively shown due to record losses, that Anne Redd was the

daughter of Thomas Redd of King and Queen County, Virginia. It is appears that her brothers

were Thomas Redd, died as a young adult in Spotsylvania County, and John Redd, of Albemarle

and Henry County, Virginia. As far as is now known, Anne Redd married Samuel Dalton at the

home of her father in King and Queen County, across the narrow Pamunkey River from Hanover

County. Anne Redd's brother, John, lived on a tract adjacent to land purchased by the Daltons

on Buck Mountain Creek in Albemarle. The Daltons did not move to this tract of land; but it is

believed that their son, David, may have lived there. He married Susannah (Susan) Davis, the

daughter of the sturdy old soldier, Isaac Davis, another Buck Mountain resident. Samuel Dalton

led an active civic life in Albemarle, serving on the Vestry of Fredricksville Parish and carrying

out other community obligations. He was a stock holder in the Loyal Land Company, created in

1747, which received a very large grant of land in southwestern Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

 

About 1765, "Samuel Dalton, his wife, Anne, six of their children, and 21 Negroes," moved to

Briery Creek near a place called Walker's Cowpn, in Georgia (Augusta County, I believe). He

received a patent forth is land in 1766 as recorded in the Colonial Records of Georgia, 1763-176

6, Vol. 9. His land was adjacent to a large tract granted to Thomas Red d. The tradition is that

while the Daltons lived in Georgia, the family experienced a number of illnesses, and one child is

reported to have died.

 

Before 1769, after a stay of only a few years in Georgia, the Daltons moved back north. Perhaps

they sought out the home of John Redd, the brother of Anne Dalton, in Pittsylvania County,

Virginia. They appear to have remained in this area while the old Patriot located the site where

the would build a new home for his family. One son (Samuel, Jr.) and four daughters (Polly,

Nancy, Sally, and Jinny) married in Pittsylvania County. The fact that three of the daughters

married within a single six-month period in 1769 probably signals that the Daltons were about to

move to their new home which was about thirty-five miles south, maybe less if you followed the

Mayo River from Pittsylvania to northwestern Rockingham County. Their new home, on the

Mayo, was in northern Guilford County (later Rockingham County) only a short distance from

the present boundary with Stokes County.

 

Before the family left Albemarle, one Dalton child, Letitia, married a neighbor, Matthew Moore,

son of John Moore of Albemarle Co. They moved to Stokes County and built their home about

half way between the John Redd home and the land her father selected in Rockingham County.

Here, the Moore name is perpetuated in features of the Stokes landscape. In addition to his very

busy civic schedule, Matthew Moore established Providence Iron Works. Matthew and Letitia

Dalton Moore built their brick home a round 1784, and it is still occupied. I was born about ten

miles from aw ay and spent many a pleasant summer day at Moore's Spring under the fatherly

gaze of Moore's Knob, the highest peak in the area.

 

A couple of hundred yards distant from the old brick home of Matthew and Letitia Moore, in a

grove of pine and cedar trees, is the family cemetery. There is a tradition that Samuel Dalton was buried at the home of Matthew and Letitia Moore. Sadly, the cemetery has been vandalized and all but one of the tombstones have disappeared. Three of the tombs are of t he elaborate table top variety - two of them adjacent to one another, and the third a little separated from them. It would appear that the adjoining tombs are where Matthew and Letitia rest; and the third once-elaborate table top tomb might be the final resting place of Sam of Mayo as tradition holds. We also visited a neighbor who now owns a bed and breakfast not far away.

 

He lived in the Moore house when he was a boy. The tombs w ere still intact then. He

remembers that the table top tombs were, as we suspected, those of Matthew and Letitia Moore,

and her father Samuel Dalton.

 

 

Samuel Dalton and Ann Redd are:

 

i. William Dalton, born 1736 in Lived in, Albemarle Co., Virginia; died May 1819 in Will Probated; married Rachel Harris Abt. 1759.

 

ii. Samuel Dalton, Jr. born 1738 in Live in, Rockingham, North Carolina; died 1790 in Beaver Island, Virginia; married Charlotte Gallihue September 22, 1767

 

iii. David Dalton, Captain, born 1740 in Albemarle, Virginia; died June 1820 in Will Probated, Stokes, North Carolina; married (1) Susan Davis; married (2) Eleanor Goode Martin December 30, 1812.

 

iv. Letitia (Letty) Dalton, born March 15, 1741/42 in Louisa, Virginia; died February 22, 1838 in Stokes, North Carolina; married Mathew P Moo re 1757

 

v. Charles Robert Dalton, born 1744 in Campbell, Virginia.

 

vi. Rachel Dalton, born 1746; died 1836; married William Peters Marti n

 

vii. Mary 'Polly' Dalton, born 1748 in Lived in, Patrick Co., Virginia; died December 28, 1841 in Patrick, Virginia; married Archie Laus Hughes September 25, 1769.

 

viii. John Dalton, born 1749 in Campbell, North Carolina.

 

ix. Jane Dalton, born 1751 in Orange, North Carolina; married Joseph Winston, Colonel March 24, 1769.

 

x. Ann "Nancy" Dalton, born 1752; died 1791; married Adonijah Harbour August 23, 1768

 

xi. Sarah Matilda Dalton, born March 12, 1754; died September 17, 18 41 in , Patrick, Virginia; married Jonathon Hanby, Captain April 06, 17 69 in Guilford, North Carolina

 

xii. Virginia "Jenny" Dalton, born 1755 in Orange, North Carolina; married David Hanby February 12, 1771.

 

xiii. Robert Dalton, born Abt. 1758.

 

We complied our info with a newsletter we have dated 1979 from Helen Lu. We are unsure if all

this information is correct 1738: Samuel was a member of the Loyal Land Company, a group of 49 men who had the right to survey and sell 800,000 acres in Augusta Co., Virginia. By 1738 the venture failed and Samuel moved to the Savannah River area of Georgia.

 

Dalton Family of Stokes County, North Carolina:

 

SAMUEL DALTON, Sr. From "Family History" by Lucy Henderson Horton:

Old family papers "prove" that Samuel Dalton of Mayo river, Rockingham, NC, and John

Dalton of the firm of Carlyle and Dalton in Alexandria, VA were brothers.

 

John Dalton was the youngest child of William Dalton, of Gloucester County, VA who died

sometime before 1733. John Dalton's oldest brother was Samuel Dalton of Mayo.

 

[Note: The foregoing section has yet to be proved.]

 

p. 83: Samuel Dalton was of an enterprising nature, and, after his marriage to Anne Dandridge

Redd, he moved to Orange county, VA and "lived when a young man, in the vicinity of the elder

James Madison, father of our President"

 

Samuel Dalton and the elder James Madison were members of the Loyal Land Company, and

invested extensively in lands in Western VA and North Carolina. ...This was first called The

Loyal Company in 1749; and that later on it was known as the Loyal Land Company.

 

This land company consisted of forty-two gentlemen. Samuel Dalton and John Hughes, a brother

of Col. Archelaus Hughes, were members.

 

The Loyal Land Company had two grants of land, one of 120,000 acres and an other grant of

800,000 acres, making in all 920,000 acres of land.

 

Before finally settling down in Rockingham, this man had been lured by the possibilities o

Georgia, and carried his family to what is now Savanna h, GA, then simply in its incipiency as

a town. Here he lost a bright child, and there was much sickness in his family. Afraid of the

miasma, he ret raced his steps, thinking to return to VA. Dalton built a house...above the

juncture with the Dan of the Mayo and near where is now Madison, N C. He thought he was in

VA, but when the boundary line was made, his home fell in NC.

 

Dr. Dalton in his manuscript says that Samuel Dalton was the wealthiest m an in all the Piedmon

region of VA and NC. His home, in which his sons and daughters grew to manhood and

womanhood, was noted for its hospitality.

 

From Robert Hunter Dalton in the Rockingham Historical Society Journal:

 

In the early part of last century, my great-grandfather (Samuel Dalton), with two of his brothers,

migrated to America and settled first in New Jersey leaving their elder brother in possession of a

large estate by the law of primogeniture. This estate lay in Yorkshire, England, not far from

Hull, and after the death of this brother, who was a dissolute bachelor and died without issue, it

became the object of long litigation...

 

From notes: Samuel Dalton died between October 20, 1805, when he made a deed of gift to his

daughter, Letitia and the end of the year. He was 106 years old and since he was born in 1699,

had the distinction of living in three centuries. In spite of the respect and veneration which Dr.

Dalton recalls, there was a quarrel within the family about Samuel's property and so me of the

heirs sought to have the old man declared incompetent. Samuel we t to live in Stokes County

with his widowed daughter, Letitia Dalton Moore; he died and was buried at her home.

 

From "History of Patrick and Henry Counties":

 

Lucy Henderson Horton quotes Thackeray: "History tells us that the younger sons of noblemen

came to America." (The English law of primogenitu re no doubt influenced them to seek their

fortunes in the New World.) "T he resident gentry was allied to good English families. Never

were people less Republican (Democratic) than those of the great province which w as soon to be

foremost in the memorable revolt against the British Crown. The gentry in VA dwelt upon their

lands after a fashion almost patriarchal, their hospitality was almost boundless, no stranger was

ever sent away from their gates. The gentry received one another and traveled to each other's

houses in a state almost feudal."

 

ii.   John Dalton.

 

John Dalton, born 1702, died in Alexandria, Va., 1777. He removed to Alexandria, then Belhaven, in 1755, and was one of the founders of the town, and one of the first trustees. He was a vestryman of "Old Christ Church, serving with George Washington, John Shaw and Thomas Carlyle. The latter was his partner, and after his death, the guardian of his two daughters, who lived with Thomas Carlyle, whose residence was the "Braddock House." John Dalton's residence is now the "Home for Aged Men." He was a member of the Committee of Correspondence for Alexandria, 1775. Washington wrote of him a "Captain." He married in December, 1749, Jemima, the daughter of Thomas and Jane Shaw, of Alexandria, born April 4, 1730, and died December 3, 1765.

 

Their daughter, Jenny Dalton, married William Herbert. They have no descendants living. Two

of their grandchildren were taken suddenly ill while on a visit to Mt. Vernon, and died there.

Both were quite young, and the last of their family. Their father was Noblett Herbert, who

married, 1819, at Mt. Vernon, Mary Lee.

 

iii.  David Dalton.

iv.  Tyrell Dalton.

v.   Timothy Dalton, born Abt. 1690.

vi.  William Dalton, born Abt. 1690.

vii. Elizabeth Dalton, born Abt. 13 May 1711.

viii. Sarah Dalton, born 11 Oct 1716.

ix.  Michael Dalton, born Sep 1720.

 

John Dalton was born Abt. 1670 in Yorkshire, England, and died in America. He married Mary Newman Brockenbrough 06 May 1707 in Richmond Co. Virginia. She died 12 Dec 1734 in North Farnham Parish, VA.

 

The colonists, brothers John and William Dalton, brothers, came to America between 1685 and 1690, settling first in Gloucester county, Va. Some of this family later settled in Westmoreland county Va., before 1722, and still later we find that they shared the restless spirit of the day, some of them settling in the vicinity of Goochland county, Virginia.

 

 

Children of John Dalton and Mary Brockenbrough are:

 

i.    Winifred Dalton.

ii.   Mary Dalton.

 

1. William Dalton was born Abt. 1655 in Yorkshire, England, and died in America.

 

The colonists, brothers John and William Dalton, brothers, came to America between 1685 and 1690, settling first in Gloucester county, Va. Some of this family later settled in Westmoreland county Va., before 1722, and still later we find that they shared the restless spirit of the day, some of them settling in the vicinity of Goochland county, Virginia.

 

From Abingdon Parish, Gloucester Co. Records 1680-1861: Children of William Dalton and wife, Margaret: Tyrell b. Feb. 20, 1708; Elizabeth Bapt. M ay 13, 1711; Margaret Bapt. Dec. 10, 1713; Sarah b. Oct. 11, 1716, Bap t. Oct. 12, 1716; Michael b. Sept. 1720; William b. ? m. Sarah Mynne Ma r. 19, 1729.

 

Children of William Dalton are:

 

i.    Samuel Dalton.

 

Samuel Dalton of Mayo was born about 1699, he died at their estate on the Mayo River,

Rockingham County, Virginia, in 1803, aged 104 years, s on of William Dalton (a descendant of

Count de Alton, who went from Normandy with William the Conqueror - ?).William, who died

before 1733, came from Yorkshire, England, about 1685 and settled in Gloucester County,

Virginia....Samuel Dalton and James Madison were intimate friends and both we re members of

the Lovel Land Company which invested extensively in lands in Western Virginia and North

Carolina. He first removed to Georgia but later returned to Virginia. He was the wealthiest man

in all the Piedmnt region of Virginia and North Carolina."

 

Information on Samuel Dalton marrying Ann Dandridge Redd:

 

Samuel was born abt. 1698/99 and died Jan or Feb 1807-yes he was over 100 years old. He died

in Stokes County, NC or Rockingham County, NC. He is buried in the Moore Family Cemetery

at the foot of Saurtown Mountain in Danbury, NC. His parents were William, b. 1679 d. 1733

and Elizabeth, b. 1677 Dalton. Ann Dandridge Redd was b. 1718 and d. 1800.

 

The origin of Samuel Dalton is unknown in spite of numerous and long standing efforts to discover his parents and place of birth. His earliest known appearance in Virginia occurs in 1734 when he purchased a tract of 400 acres in Hanover County from John Dowell. Prior to that date, his name is not found in any source, including the parish records of Gloucester, New Kent, or Hanover Counties. The tract of land he purchased from John Dowell lay between Priddy's Creek and Wolf Trap Creek in the northeastern corner of present Albemarle County, Virginia. It was not technically in Albemarle until this corner of the county was separated from Louisa County in 1761. Before that, records for Samuel Dalton are found in Hanover County, Goochland County, and Louisa County - the progression of county formation on this early frontier of Virginia

 

It was probably soon after his 1734 acquisition of 400 acres of land that he married Anne Redd. It is believed, but cannot be definitively shown due to record losses, that Anne Redd was the daughter of Thomas Redd of King and Queen County, Virginia. It is appears that her brothers w ere Thomas Redd, died as a young adult in Spotsylvania County, and John Redd, of Albemarle and Henry County, Virginia. As far as is now known, Anne Redd married Samuel Dalton at the home of her father in King and Queen County, across the narrow Pamunkey River from Hanover County. Anne Redd's brother, John, lived on a tract adjacent to land purchased by the Daltons on Buck Mountain Creek in Albemarle. The Daltons did not move to this tract of land; but it is believed that their son, David, may have lived there. He married Susannah (Susan) Davis, the daughter of the sturdy o ld soldier, Isaac Davis, another Buck Mountain resident. Samuel Dalton led an active civic life in Albemarle, serving on the Vestry of Fredricksville Parish and carrying out other community obligations. He was a stock h older in the Loyal Land Company, created in 1747, which received a very large grant of land in southwestern Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

 

About 1765, "Samuel Dalton, his wife, Anne, six of their children, and 21 Negroes," moved to Briery Creek near a place called Walker's Cowpen, in Georgia (Augusta County, I believe). He received a patent for this land in 1766 as recorded in the Colonial Records of Georgia, 1763-176 6, Vol. 9. His land was adjacent to a large tract granted to Thomas Red d. The tradition is that while the Daltons lived in Georgia, the family experienced a number of illnesses, and one child is reported to have died.

 

Before 1769, after a stay of only a few years in Georgia, the Daltons moved back north. Perhaps they sought out the home of John Redd, the brother of Anne Dalton, in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. They appear to have remained in this area while the old Patriot located the site where he would build a new home for his family. One son (Samuel, Jr.) and four daughters (Polly, Nancy, Sally, and Jinny) married in Pittsylvania County. The fact that three of the daughters married within a single six-month period in 1769 probably signals that the Daltons were about to move to their new home which was about thirty-five miles south, maybe less if you followed the Mayo River from Pittsylvania to northwestern Rockingham County. Their new home, on the Mayo, was in northern Guilford County (later Rockingham County) only a short distance from the present boundary with Stokes County.

 

Before the family left Albemarle, one Dalton child, Letitia, married a neighbor, Matthew Moore, son of John Moore of Albemarle Co. They moved to Stokes County and built their home about half way between the John Redd home and the land her father selected in Rockingham County. Here, the Moore name is perpetuated in features of the Stokes landscape. In addition to his very busy civic schedule, Matthew Moore established Providence Iron Works. Matthew and Letitia Dalton Moore built their brick home a round 1784, and it is still occupied. I was born about ten miles from aw ay and spent many a pleasant summer day at Moore's Spring under the fatherly gaze of Moore's Knob, the highest peak in the area.

 

A couple of hundred yards distant from the old brick home of Matthew an Letitia Moore, in a grove of pine and cedar trees, is the family cemetery. There is a tradition that Samuel Dalton was buried at the home of Matt hew and Letitia Moore. Sadly, the cemetery has been vandalized and all but one of the tombstones have disappeared. Three of the tombs are of the elaborate table top variety - two of them adjacent to one another, and the third a little separated from them. It would appear that the adjoining tombs are where Matthew and Letitia rest; and the third once-elaborate table top tomb might be the final resting place of Sam of Mayo as tradition holds. We also visited a neighbor who now owns a bed and breakfast not far away. He lived in the Moore house when he was a boy. The tombs were still intact then. He remembers that the table top tombs were, as we suspected, those of Matthew and Letitia Moore, and her father Samuel Dalton.

 

Samuel Dalton and Ann Redd are:

 

i. William Dalton, born 1736 in Lived in, Albemarle Co., Virginia; died May 1819 in Will Probated; married Rachel Harris Abt. 1759.

 

ii. Samuel Dalton, Jr. born 1738 in Live in, Rockingham, North Carolina; died 1790 in Beaver Island, Virginia; married Charllote Gallihue September 22, 1767.

 

iii. David Dalton, Captain, born 1740 in Albemarle, Virginia; died June 1820 in Will Probated, Stokes, North Carolina; married (1) Susan Davis; married (2) Eleanor Goode Martin December 30, 1812.

 

iv. Letitia (Letty) Dalton, born March 15, 1741/42 in Louisa, Virginia; died February 22, 1838 in Stokes, North Carolina; married Mathew P Moo re 1757.

 

v. Charles Robert Dalton, born 1744 in Campbell, Virginia.

 

vi. Rachel Dalton, born 1746; died 1836; married William Peters Marti n.

 

vii. Mary 'Polly' Dalton, born 1748 in Lived in, Patrick Co., Virginia; died December 28, 1841 in Patrick, Virginia; married Archie Laus Hughes September 25, 1769.

viii. John Dalton, born 1749 in Campbell, North Carolina.

ix. Jane Dalton, born 1751 in Orange, North Carolina; married Joseph Winston, Colonel March 24, 1769.

 

x. Ann "Nancy" Dalton, born 1752; died 1791; married Adonijah Harbour August 23, 1768

xi. Sarah Matilda Dalton, born March 12, 1754; died September 17, 1841 in , Patrick, Virginia; married Jonathon Hanby, Captain April 06, 17 69 in Guilford, North Carolina.

 

xii. Virginia "Jenny" Dalton, born 1755 in Orange, North Carolina; married David Hanby February 12, 1771.

 

xiii. Robert Dalton, born Abt. 1758.

 

We complied our info with a newsletter we have dated 1979 from Helen Lu. We are unsure if all this information is correct.

 

John Dalton was born 1675 in Of Bedale, Yorkshire, England, and died 1701. He married Jane Thornton Abt. 1693. She was born Abt. 1667 in Of Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

     

Child of John Dalton and Jane Thornton is:

 

i.    Captain James Dalton, born Abt. 1699 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England; died 1742 in West Indies.

 

Generation No. 9

 

9. Captain James Dalton was born Abt. 1699 in Hawkswell, Yorkshire, England, and died 1742 in West Indies. He married Elizabeth Smith Abt. 1725. She was born 18 Sep 1698 in Salem, Essex Co. Massachusetts, and died Abt. 1769.

 

James Dalton was a Captain in the 6th, Regt. of Foot, who died while on active duty in the West Indies in 1742.

     

Child of Captain Dalton and Elizabeth Smith is:

 

i.    Captain John Dalton, born 1726 in Hauxwell, Yorkshire, England; died Jul 1811 in East Indies.

 

Generation No. 10

 

10. Captain John Dalton was born 1726 in Hauxwell, Yorkshire, England, and died Jul 1811 in East Indies. He married (1) Mary Wray, daughter of Sir Wray and Frances Norcliffe. She died 20 Jul 1807 in Langton, Yorkshire, England. He married (2) Isabella Wray 18 Mar 1756 in Slenningford, Yorkshire, England, daughter of Sir Wray and Frances Norcliffe. She was born 16 May 1731 in Hauxwell, Yorkshire, England, and died 29 May 1780 in Tansfield, Yorkshire Co. England.

 

Notes for Captain John Dalton:

 

Captain John Dalton was born in 1726 the only child of Capt. James Dalton, 6th foot. He was the great-great-grandson of Colonel John Dalton, of Cley Hall, near Otley, a royalist officer of an old Yorkshire family, desperately wounded in the civil wars. Dalton's father was killed in the West Indies in 1742. He had previously obtained a second lieutenancy in the 8th marines for his son, who at the time was only fifteen. Dalton served off of Madagascar and the Coromandel Coast. When the marine regiments we re disbanded in 1748, Dalton was appointed first lieutenant of one of t he independent marines companies formed on the shore of Madras by order of Admiral Boscawen. The year after he transferred his service to the East India Company, and became captain of a company of European grenadiers. The next three years he campaigned against the French and their native allies. In June of 1752, he was appointed commandant of Trichinopoly. It was at Trichinopoly, Dalton, with a small and dwindling detachment, skillfully defended the encampment for two years before re-enforcements and relief came. In 1754, he resigned his commissions on the grounds of ill health. With the thanks of the governor and council he returned to England. At the age of twenty-eight he returned having 'amassed a fortune of 10,000 pounds and a fair share of military fame.

 

He married 7 March 1756, the second daughter of Sir John Wray, bart., of Glentworth, Lincolnshire and Sleningford, Yorkshire. After his wife 's death in 1787 Dalton resided at Sleningford, which he had purchased from her brother Sir Cecil Wray. Of his six children, two sons became military officers. The third son, James, became a clergyman and eminent botanist whose collection is a part of the York Museum. Captain Dalton died 11 July 1811.

 

Sources:

Historical Manuscripts Commission

UK National Register of Archives

(1726-1811) Captain East India Co. Army

1746-54: journal of military transactions in the East Indies

East Riding of Yorkshire Archives and Records Service

 

The year previous to her marriage, Mary Wray had inherited the Norcliffe e states on the death of her maternal uncle, Thomas Norcliffe of Langton, w ho died unmarried, and in accordance with her uncle's desire, Mary Wray as sumed the name and arms of Norcliffe, which name and arms Sir James Innes was by will obliged to assume also. Lady Norcliffe died without issue, 20th July, 1807, and was buried in Langton church. She was succeeded by her nephew, Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, eldest son of Captain Dalton a nd her sister Isabella. Isabella Wray, second daughter of Sir John Wray, by Frances Norcliffe, his wife, was born, 16th May, 1731, and married 1 1th March, 1756, Captain John Dalton.

     

Children of Captain Dalton and Isabella Wray are:

 

i.    Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, born 31 Dec 1756 in St. Helen's, Yorkshire Co., England; died 01 Jun 1820 in Spring Gardens, London, England.

 

ii.   Lt. Col. John Dalton, born 24 Jul 1758 in Of Sleningford And Fillingham, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Sep 1841 in Sleningford, Yorkshire, England.

 

iii.  Frances Elizabeth Dalton, born 09 Jul 1759 in Sleningford, Yorkshire, England; died 08 Jan 1800. She married William Garforth Mar 1778; born in Of Wigonthorpe.

 

 

iv.  Rev. James Robert Dalton, born 14 Nov 1761 in Of Croft, Yorkshire, England; died 01 Jan 1843.

 

v.   Isabella Dalton, born Abt. 1763 in Sleningford, Yorkshire, England; died 18 Jun 1833. She married George Baker 1787; born in Of Elsmore, Durham Co. England.

 

Generation No. 11

 

11. Thomas Norcliffe-Dalton was born 31 Dec 1756 in St. Helen's, Yorkshire Co., England, and died 01 Jun 1820 in Spring Gardens, London, England. He married Anne Wilson 13 Dec 1784 in Belfreys, York, England. She was born 30 May 1762 in Allenton, Gledhow, York, England, and died 25 Sep 1835.

 

Thomas Norcliffe-Dalton was Captain of the 11th, Dragoons, and was afterwards Lieutenant Colonel of the York Volunteers who inherited the Norcliffe states on the death of his aunt, Lady Norcliff in 1807. He assumed in 18 07 the surname and arms of Norcliff.

 

Documents concerning the Norcliffe inheritance:

 

FILE - Copy of Lease and release to create tenancy to the precipe [lease not copied]. (1782) - ref. YM/D/NOR/2 - date: 8 June 1785.

 

Sir James Norcliffe, bart. (formerly Sir James Innes), and Mary Norcliffe his wife (a niece and devisee under the will of Thomas Norcliffe of Langton, esq., deceased); Thomas Norcliffe, esq. (formerly Thomas Dalton), Captain in the 11th Dragoons, eldest son of Isabella Dalton, deceased, by John Dalton her husband, she being another of the nieces and devisees of Thomas Norcliffe; William Barton Borwick of Gray's Inn, Middx., gent.; John D alton of Sleningford, esq.; Sir Cecil Wray of Summer Castle, parish of Fillingham, Lincs., bart.; Thomas Grimston of 'Killwich', esq., eldest son and heir at law of John Grimston, late of the same place, esq., deceased.

 

Following the death of Lady Norcliffe, all the properties are to pass to her heir male according to the will of Thomas Norcliffe. Langton is to be held by Sir James for term of 80 years if he lives, subject to impeachment of waste other than for timbers used for repairs at Langton. On the

termination of his estate, the lands, with all other properties following the death of Lady Norcliffe, is to be subject to the direction of Thomas Norcliffe if he survives, and following termination of that direction to h is use and that of his heirs male, failing which they are to pass to the uses of John Dalton (second son of Isabella Dalton), in like manner, and failing his heirs to the uses as directed by James Dalton (third son of Isabella Dalton) in like manner, failing whose heirs male they are to pass to use of Sir Cecil Wray for the life of France, wife of Thomas Arthington, esq. (she being formerly Frances Wray, another of the nieces of Thom as Norcliffe, deceased). Wray is to pay over the income to her, or as directed by her, to prevent the income being subjected to the demands of her husband's creditors. If Wray's estate terminated during her life, the lands are to be held to use of Thomas Grimston and his heirs to preserves the contingent uses, but to permit her to continue to receive the income. Following her death, they are to pass to her heirs male in order, failing which to the right heirs of Thomas Norcliffe, deceased.

 

Thomas Norcliffe (or, after his death, the heirs in remainder) may dispose of the Heslington and York properties absolutely by sale or exchange, with the consent of the holder of the term of 99 years, at which point all the trusts are to be extinguished, but the lands acquired by exchange or with the money from the sale are to be burdened with like trusts. Until all the money thus acquired has been spent, it is to be held by Sir Cecil Wray or John Dalton, Sr., or the survivor, or the executors and administrators of Wray following the death of Dalton, and until used for purchases is to be invested at interest in their names, and during the life of Lady Norcliffe the income there from is to be paid over to whoever would receive the income from the lands if unsold. Following the death of Lady Norcliffe, the principal and interest are to be paid over if the inheritor is over 21, otherwise he shall receive the interest only until that date.

 

FILE - Copy of Marriage Settlement. (1784) - ref. YM/D/NOR/3 - date: 18 September 1793.

 

Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, esq., eldest son of Isabella Dalton as above; Ann Wilson of York, widow and administratrix of William Wilson, late of Allerton Gledhow, parish of Leeds, esq., deceased, she being the only daughter and heir at law of Henry Pawson late of Leeds, gent., deceased, by Ann Pawson his wife, deceased, the only daughter and heir of Hugh Sleigh late of Leeds, esq., deceased; Ann Wilson the younger of York, spinster, on y child of Ann Wilson by William Wilson, and his heir at law; Henry Dunco mbe of Copgrove, esq., and Richard Wilson of Follifoot, esq,; Thomas Wils on of Leeds, esq., and Richard Lodge of the same, esq.

 

For the marriage of Thomas Norcliffe-Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger: Anne Wilson the younger also has £4300 in 3% consols, again with Thomas Wilson as trustee, and other monies at interest and in trust. Anne Wilson senior also proposes to pay to Dalton £1000, following the marriage.

 

£1300 of the £4300 to be transferred to trustees, with the residue and all other estates of Anne Wilson the younger to go to Dalton.

 

Following the marriage, the messuage or tenement forming the Hare and Hounds public house at the north end of Vicar Lane, Leeds, with the adjoining buildings and a garth or croft lying behind the messuage (other than ½ poles now staked out), now in the tenure or occupation of William Rayner, and part of the north side of the close called Crackenthorpe Garden n ear Vicar Lane, now in Rayner's occupation and adjoining the garth or croft, being north of a line drawn across the close (as detailed) and containing 36 poles (apart from a strip 12-14ft. wide to form an access road as de tailed, and right of access for repairs to adjoining properties) to be to use of Anne Wilson, widow, for her to convey absolutely. The s hare of the manor of Leeds is to go to Dalton and his heirs. The remainder of the properties are to be held to the use of Anne Wilson, widow, f or life; thereafter to Dalton and his assigns for life; thereafter to Duncombe and Wilson as trustees to preserve contingent estates and trusts; and following the deaths of Anne Wilson widow and T.N. Dalton, in trust to sell the Manor of Northall (unless the sale had previously been arranged) and the other properties limited to the use of the trustees, or to raise money by mortgage to fulfill the trusts. The money from the sales and mortgages and the income from the estate to be used (following the payment of interest from the income from the properties (1) to fulfill the trusts; (2) in conjunction with the sum of £8400 in 3% consols, to provide portions for the children of the marriage of Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger (the system being set out in detail); and (3) to hold any properties un sold, with the rights of redemption on mortgaged properties, following the fulfillment of the above trusts, to uses as directed by Anne Wilson t he younger, with the consent of her husband during his life, failing which direction the trustees are to pay the surplus income to Anne Wilson t he younger during her life, thereafter the money to be held in trust for t he first son of her marriage with Dalton, with remainder to the other so ns and the heirs male of their bodies, with remainder to the successive daughters of the marriage as co-heiresses and tenants in common, and the heirs of their bodies, so that if any one dies without issue that share shall be shared among the others, with remainder to any sole surviving daughter and her issue, failing which with remainder to Anne Wilson, widow, and her heirs and assigns.

 

No monies are to be raised for the payment of portions until they become due, unless as provided for; no more is to be raised than is sufficient to cover what is due, unless consented to by Dalton, Anne Wilson, widow, and Anne Wilson the younger, or the survivor of them, and they

participate in the appropriate deeds. Such money raised is to be subject to the same trusts. Anne Wilson widow, and after her death T.N. Dalton if he survives, can lease out the properties for terms not exceeding 21 years at best rents obtainable, as detailed. During her life, Anne Wilson, widow, with the written consent of Dalton (and thereafter, Dalton, with the written consent of the trustees) may demise properties for improvements or f or building on for terms not exceeding 50 years, as detailed. If Anne Wilson the younger dies during the lifetime of Anne Wilson, widow, without issue, or if the issue all die before reaching their majorities, then any direction made by Anne Wilson the younger is to be void, and the trusts etc. to be treated as though no direction had been made.

 

Anne Wilson, widow, and Anne Wilson the younger covenant with the trustees that £7100 of 3% consols, and £1300 of the same (part of the sum of £43 00) shall be transferred to trustees after the marriage, the remaining £30 00 of the £4300 to be vested in Dalton. The trustees are to hold the £84 00 with any money raised to make up the children's portions as previously detailed, in trust, with the written consent of T.N. Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger, if living, to be invested in the names of the trustees until it becomes due to be paid out. Dalton or his assigns shall receive t he income from the investments, after his death it is to go to Anne Wilson the younger, or her assigns during the joint lives of her and Anne Wilson, widow. The income from the money raised from sales of land to go to An ne Wilson, widow, or her assigns during the joint lives of her and Dalton or the survivor, and after her death to Dalton and his assigns for

life, and thereafter is to be used to pay the portions of the children as previously set out, subject to any limitation in writing set out by Dalton or Anne Wilson the younger during their joint lives, failing which direction as Dalton prescribes if he survives his wife, or as he wills. Failing any such direction, the payment of the portions is to be as set out in the settlement, dependent on whether Anne Wilson, widow, Anne Wilson the younger, and Dalton are all dead, or if any of them survive. With the written consent of all three during their lives, or at their own discretion following their deaths, the trustees may use some of the portions to set up the children in trade, or to arrange marriages, etc. In the meantime, they are to spend part of the income on the maintenance and education of the children. If any of the money is not put at interest but is raised on the estate, then the trustees are to use the income from the estate equal to the amount charged on it at 4% for the maintenance and education of the children until it is placed out at interest, without prejudice to any previous trusts established for Anne Wilson, widow, or T.N. Dalton, unless they consent thereto. If the amount paid out for maintenance and education is less than the sum available for these purposes, the surplus is to accumulate to augment the portions, or to be used for increasing the amount spent on maintenance and education in succeeding years. If any children die before reaching the age of 21 or the date when payment should be made, their prospective portions (less any sum already expended) a re to be divided among the survivors, provided that no child receives mo re than £12000 unless he be an eldest or only surviving son or the only s on who reaches the age of 21 out of one or two surviving children, or £100 00 in other cases; and the eldest or only son is not to have any part of t hose portions unless entitled to the sum of £10000 as the only surviving child of the marriage. If Dalton gives property to any child for marriage, etc., other than for maintenance and education, and if this advancement is equal to or exceeds the prospective portion, it is to be consider d as payment of the portion, which shall then be paid over to him and his assigns when it falls due; if he makes over less than the full equivalent, this is to be considered partial payment, and he can receive recompense when the full payment falls due. If there are no children or no surviving issue, the £8400 in 3% consols or the remainder thereof are to be placed in trust to use of Dalton absolutely, any sum being raised to supplement the sum being allowed to sink back into the inheritance of the properties and be subjected to the appropriate trusts.

 

Remainder of £4300 in 3% consols, and other personal estate of Anne Wilson the younger, with the additional £1000 from Anne Wilson, widow, and t he settlement of the properties by her and Anne Wilson the younger, are in tended to create a jointure for the intended marriage. T.N. Dalton, in virtue of his authority derived from lease, grants that the property mentioned therein shall (except for any uses or estates limited thereby to Dame Mary Norcliffe and her successive sons and their heirs male as detailed the rein) pass after his death to the use of Anne Wilson the younger and her assigns if the marriage takes place and she survives him, to become chargeable with annual rent charge of £300 from the property at Heslington and York, and after the death of the survivor of Mary Norcliffe and T.N. Dalton, a further annual rent charge of £200 from the property at Eddlethorpe, the sum or sums to be paid to her in the Guildhall at York in two equal parts without any deductions, the first installment being paid at the end of a calendar month after the death of Dalton. This arrangement ma de to avoid any dower rights in the properties. If either of the sums is in arrears by more than 20 days, Anne Wilson the younger may enter and distrain for reimbursement with costs. If payments are in arrears f or 40 days, and even if no demands made, she may re-enter and receive t he income from the property in full until payment made, with costs.

 

After the death of T.N. Dalton, and the extinction of the issue male of t he body of Mary Norcliffe, the moiety of the manor of Heslington and the properties in York are to be held to the use of Thomas Wilson and Richard Lodge for term of 200 years from the death of Dalton, the Eddlethorpe property being held by them for a similar term from the death of the survivor of him and Mary Norcliffe, as trustees, After the termination or sooner determination of the terms, the lands are to be held to the use of t he first son of Dalton by Anne Wilson the younger and his heirs male, and so to the other sons and their heirs male in remainder, failing which t hey are to go to use of Henry Duncombe and Richard Wilson as trustees, for term of 900 years. Following termination or sooner determination of that term, they shall pass to the uses as declared by Dalton if he survives Mary Norcliffe, and until such direction made, to such uses as the

properties were limited to immediately after the execution of this deed, as much as possible. The terms of 200 years are limited to Lodge and Wilson as trustees so that if default is made in the payments to Anne Wilson t he younger for 60 days and more, and even if no demand is made, they can mortgage, sell, or otherwise dispose of the property to secure full payment of the annual charges throughout the terms, and recover costs, damage s, and arrears, but in the meantime allowing the freeholder of the proper tying expectation of the determination of the terms to receive the surplus from the income. Following the death of Anne Wilson the younger, and the fulfillment of the trusts, or the impossibility of their performance he trustees are to be reimbursed their expenses in the execution thereof, and the terms of 200 years are to determine.

 

The term of 900 years is created to allow Duncombe and Wilson from its commencement (or before, during the lifetime of T.N. Dalton and Anne Wilson t he younger, and with their written consent following the expiration of their issue male) to add to the portions of the daughters of the marriage further to allowances previously made: if only one daughter surviving, £1000 0, but if two or more, £12000, to be divided as directed by Dalton or by h is will, failing which direction to be divided equally among them. If any die before reaching the age of 21, that share to be divided equally among the others, unless otherwise directed by Dalton, provided that no

daughter shall receive more than £10000 by survivorship. If all daughters die unmarried or before their majority, the money is to pass to the person next in remainder expectant upon determination of the term. Until the portions fall due, Duncombe and Wilson are to use the money for the maintenance and education of the daughters, provided that this does not exceed t he interest on the portion at the rate of 4%, or the rents and incomes of the properties. No disposal is to be made of the properties until o ne of the portions falls due. If Dalton advances any money for the portion of any daughters, he may be reimbursed by Duncombe and Wilson. The term is to determine if no daughters reach the age of 21 or marry, or if all the portions are paid out. Dalton may lease out the properties during h is life for terms not exceeding 21 years, in possession and not reversion, and as if no trust existed, subject to certain conditions (detailed).

 

Notwithstanding preceding trusts, Duncombe and Wilson may, during the joint lives of Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger and the life of the survivor, as directed by them, sell or exchange for lands elsewhere in England these lands granted by Anne Wilson widow and Anne Wilson the younger, which were not already limited to the uses of either Anne Wilson the younger or T.N. Dalton, and those granted by Dalton, revoking any trusts and uses involved, and imposing new limitations and trusts as appropriate, with authority to give receipts for the money involved. The monies received for any sales are to be added to the £950 already received for lands limited to the use of Anne Wilson, widow, which is to be paid to the trustees immediately after the marriage of Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger. T he surplus of any money over and above the portions before limited is to be used for further purchases of land in England, to be held subject to the same uses, trusts, and limitations as the sold lands, such trusts etc. being implemented as far as possible. Until these further purchases are made, the money is to be invested at interest, with authority for dealing in the stocks etc. thus bought, the money received from this being subject to the same trusts etc. as the sold lands until a purchase is made, or until someone becomes tenant in tail or fee simple in possession, by reaching his majority. Thereafter the monies are to be laid out f or his benefit, or as they direct, without having to be put into land or s uffering a recovery, after which payment all subsequent trusts will be extinguished. No such payment or direction is to affect any appointments ma de by Anne Wilson the younger.

 

Anne Wilson, widow, covenants with T.N. Dalton for payment of £1000 to his absolute use after the marriage, to augment the portion of Anne Wilson the younger in accordance with the settlement. Anne Wilson widow and An ne Wilson the younger covenant independently with Dalton, Duncombe, and Wilson for the fulfillment of the trusts in lands released by them, with peaceful possession, un-encumbrance (other than any leases presently in force ), and assurance of title to them at all times after the marriage. Dalton covenants with Thomas Wilson and Richard Lodge that, if he marries and Anne Wilson the younger survives him, and the income from the properties proves insufficient to maintain the annual payments to her of £300 and £200, his heirs will make up the deficiency from their own pocket s. If Anne Wilson the younger outlives Anne Wilson, widow, Dalton, and Ma ry Norcliffe, this provision shall not apply if she then receives £1000 per annum clear as a result of preceding provisions. Dalton covenants with Duncombe and Richard Wilson that the lands released by Anne Wilson, widow, and Anne Wilson the younger and appointed by him shall continue to t he uses and upon the trusts as previously detailed, with peaceful possession, un-encumbrance, indemnification against previous acts, and assurance of title following the marriage to Duncombe, Thomas Wilson, Richard

Wilson, and Lodge. If any trustee or his successor dies or proves incapable or wishes to be replaced, Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger during their joint lives, and thereafter the survivor, and thereafter the surviving trustees, may nominate replacements. The trustees are only to be charge able for such monies as they actually receive in execution of the trusts, regardless of the paperwork involved, and are responsible only as individuals with no collective responsibility. They may retain expenses from receipts and reimburse other trustees for costs etc. Dalton and Anne Wilson the younger may, after marriage, and with the consents of Anne Wilson, widow, and John Dalton during their joint lives, or the survivor, and t hat of Duncombe and Richard Wilson or the survivor, and with the consent of the trustees after the deaths of Anne Wilson, widow, and John Dalton, alter and amend the trusts etc. concerning the manor of Northall and t he other properties released by Anne Wilson, widow, and Anne Wilson the younger, and which are not limited to the uses of Anne Wilson, widow, or T. N. Dalton, and also the £8400 of 3% consols, by a joint deed to create new trusts, uses, etc.

 

After the marriage, T.N. Dalton, with the consent of Anne Wilson, widow, Anne Wilson the younger, and John Dalton, or the survivor of them, and thereafter with the consent of Thomas Wilson and Richard Lodge or the survivor, may revoke the trusts etc. on the lands appointed by him and charged with annual payments of £300 and £200, in order to declare new trusts, use s, etc.

 

FILE - Copies of documents concerning marriage settlement - ref. YM/D/NOR /4 - date: 18 September 1794.

 

Thomas Norcliffe Dalton and Anne his wife (late Anne Wilson the younger ); Henry Duncombe (Richard Wilson his co-trustee being dead); John Becke tt of Leeds, banker; George Townend of York, gent.

 

Refers to marriage and the transference of the £8400 in 3% consols as in t he marriage settlement. Richard Wilson is now dead, all the trusts and properties being now vested in Duncombe. The lands limited in 3 as being so ld for £950 had been sold, other lands also sold according to the terms of the marriage settlement had increased the total from such sales to £ 5032 10s., of which £300 was lent at interest to Thomas Jennings of Leeds, cabinetmaker, with Anne Wilson, widow, as the nominal mortgagor, but as trustee only; the remainder of the money had been put in her name as trustee for purchase of £4511 12s. 5d. of 5% consols. Various min or properties at Heslington had also been sold for £1969 10s., of which £1 336 10s. had been used for the purchase of £1753 10s. 11d. of 3% consols ., £135 had been used for building new outbuildings for the messuage with in the city of York, and the remaining £525 had been retained by Dalton f or the purchase of tithes at Heslington held by a lease for years. Duncom be had revoked all the trusts etc. regarding the lands disposed of, and h ad conveyed them as directed. John Beckett had been nominated by Dalton and his wife as the new trustee.

 

Manor of Eddlethorpe, moiety of the manor of Heslington, and lands in York and its suburbs as in the marriage settlements, with all other properties limited by the marriage settlement to Duncombe and Richard Wilson f or a term of 900 years, other than lands at Heslington since sold: two closes called Perkins Close and MiddleIng, containing 13 acres, with a messuage or dwelling house with buildings and a garden, sold to John Clarke of Heslington, yeoman, for £870, by lease and release of October 178 7; close called Half-Gate Close, containing 4½ acres, sold to Thomas Spink of York, cabinetmaker, and Tamar his wife, for £340 by lease and release of 19, 20 October 1787; frontstead or site of a cottage or dwellinghou se with the garth thereto belonging, leased by Dalton to Ann Yarburgh, wid ow, on 1 February 1741 for 99 years from Lady Day then next following at 7 s. per annum, with a frontstead leased by Dame Mary Norcliffe to Jeremiah Shadwell on 14 May 1768 for 99 years from 10 October then next

following, if she lived, at 15s. per annum, and a close containing 6 acres adjoining the low moor or common pasture of Walmgate Ward in York, all being sold to James Todd of Heslington, gent., for £450 by lease and release of 4, 5 April 1788; a messuage and cottage with outbuildings and garths adjoining each other on the south side of the town street, sold to Thom as Robinson of Heslington, gent., for £136 10s. by lease and release of 4, 5 April 1788; moiety of a messuage with outbuildings, garth, and an orchard, on the north of the town street, then in the occupation of John Nicholson, with all of Spring Lane Close, containing 3 acres, a djoining Spring Lane on the east and then in the tenure of Thomas White, sold to William Umpleby of Heslington, gent., for £135 by lease and release of 4, 5 April 1788; a messuage or cottage and garth with common right s, sold to Joseph Ware of Hewlington, blacksmith, for £70 by lease and rel ease of 14, 15 July 1788.

 

Townend to hold the property for the term of 900 years if it comes into effect, for assignment to Duncombe and Beckett at Dalton's costs.

 

George Townend of York, as above; Dalton and his wife, as above; Henry Duncombe, esq., and John Beckett, banker.

 

Children of Thomas Dalton and Anne Wilson are:

 

i.    Mary Ann Norcliffe, born 09 Dec 1786 in Of Langton, York, England; died 17 Mar 1837.

ii.   William Norcliffe Dalton, born 09 Dec 1786 in Of Langton, York, England.

iii.  Charlotte Norcliffe Dalton, born 14 Sep 1788 in Of Langton, York, England.

iv.  Mary Norchiffe Dalton, born 11 Feb 1790 in Of Langton, York, England.

v.   Sir Norcliffe ( Dalton) Norcliffe, born 24 Sep 1791; died 08 Feb 1862. He married Decima Hester Beatrix 24 Jun 1824.

 

Notes for Sir Norcliffe (Dalton) Norcliffe:

 

Norcliffe who served in the 4th Dragoons during the Peninsular War and distinguished himself at

Salamanca where he was severely wounded. This gallant officer who was a Knight of Hanover

died a Major General in 1862 and leaving no surviving issue was succeeded by his niece Mrs. Robinson.

 

Norcliffe Norcliffe, Esq., the eldest son, was major-general in the army, and succeeded to the estate in 1820. He married Decima Hester Beatrix, daughter of John Robinson Foulis, Esq., and had by her an only son, w ho predeceased his father unmarried. General Norcliffe died in 1862, and t he estate passed to his niece Rosamond, elder daughter of his sister, Mary Norcliffe Best. This lady married Henry Robinson, Esq., of York, and died in 1881, when the Rev. C. Best Norcliffe, her eldest surviving son, succeeded to the estate.

 

vi.  Emily Norcliffe Dalton, born 14 Jul 1799 in Of Langton, York, England; died in

 

Lt. Col. John Dalton was born 24 Jul 1758 in Of Sleningford And Fillingham, Yorkshire, England, and died 29 Sep 1841 in Sleningford, Yorkshire, England. He married Susanna Prescott 01 Mar 1783, daughter of Robert Prescott. She was born Abt. 1763 in Of Rose Green, Sussex Co. England, and died 15 Apr 1823.

 

Inherited the Wray estates. Lieut. Col. 4th, Light Dragoons.

     

Children of Lt. Dalton and Susanna Prescott are:

 

i.    John Dalton III, born 1784 in Of Fillingham Castle; died 01 Jul 1864 in Brighton.

ii.   Susanna Isabella Dalton, born 1785; died in . She married Sir Charles Dalbiac 1805.

iii.  James Robert Dalton, born 1786; died 1860. He married Isabella Diss. JamesRobert

commander in the royal navy.

 

iv.  Major Gen. Charles Dalton, born 1789 in Of Steningford, York, England; died 1871.

v.   George Dalton, born 1794; died 10 Jun 1854 in North End House, Uxbridge. He married Euphemia Hannington 1829.

 

George, lieutenant royal engineers, m. in August, 1829 Euphemia Caulfiel, daughter of

Thomas Hannington, esq. of Dungannon Castle, Derry, Ireland.

 

 

vi.  William Serjeantson Dalton, born 1803; died 17 Dec 1853 in Flesk Lodge, Killarney, Ireland. He married Laura King 08 Mar 1830.

 

William-Serjeantson, an officer in the army, m. in January, 1830, Laura, daughter of Captain King, R.N.

 

vii. Maria Catherine Dalton, born 1805; died 1866. She married George Cleghorn 1830.

Maria-Catherine, m. to George Cleghorn, esq. of the Weens, in Roxburghshir e, and has issue.

 

viii. Madeline Agnes Dalton, born 1810.

 

 

Rev. James Robert Dalton was born 14 Nov 1761 in Of Croft, Yorkshire, England, and died 01 Jan 1843. He married Maria Gibson 1794.

 

Rev. James Dalton, M.A., F.L.S., Rector of Croft, Yorkshire, Married Maria Gibson, daughter and co-heir of Rev. Edmund Gibson.

 

FILE - Bond of indemnity for peaceable enjoyment. - date: 8 Sept., 1827:

James Dalton of Croft, Yorks., clerk, Cecil Wray Dalton of Magdalen Colleg e, Cambridge, esq., and John Dalton of Sleningford, Yorks., esq. to Edmu nd Turnor of Stoke Rochford, esq., in £5,000.

 

FILE - Lease for a year. - date: 7 Sept. 1827:

The Rev. James Dalton of Croft, Yorks., and Maria his wife and Cecil Wray Dalton of College Cambridge, esq.

 

FILE - Abstract of title, with opinion - date 1826:

Title of the Rev. James Dalton and his wife and their son to an estate called Strubby in par. Langton and to a moiety of the advowson of the church of Langton, 1675-1794.

 

FILE - Declaration of trusts and duplicate. - date: 15 June, 1826:

The Rev. James Dalton of Croft, Yorks, clerk.

Agreed that (3) shall stand possessed of the Bank Annuities in trust to ac cumulate the dividends and invest them in further Bank Annuities, and after the final conveyance, then to transfer the Bank Annuities to James Dalton and Maria his wife and Cecil Dalton. If the conveyance is not made, t he annuities are to be sold and the money paid to Turnor.

 

FILE - Lease and release to make a tenant to the precipe. - date: 31 Jan. and L Feb., 1827:

(1) The Rev. James Dalton of Croft, Yorks., clerk, and Maria his wife.

(2) Cecil Wray Dalton, eldest son of the said James Dalton and Maria.

 

The recovery to be to the use of such person or persons as (1) and (2) shall appoint, and in default of such appointment to the use of the said Jam s Dalton and his assigns for term of his life, then to the use of Maria and her assigns for her life, and after the death of the survivor of the m, to the use of (2), his heirs and assigns for ever.

 

FILE - Exemplification of a recovery - date: 1828:

William Elmsall Carter, gent., demandant v. James Dalton and Maria his wife and Cecil Wray Dalton.

     

Children of Rev. Dalton and Maria Gibson are:

 

i.    Marie Dalton.

ii.   Mary Ann Dalton.

iii.  Frances Elizabeth Dalton, born 1801. She married Rev. John Walker Harrison.

Frances-Elizabeth, m. to the Rev. John Walker Harrison, of Norton-le-Clay, in the county of

York, and

has issue.

 

iv.  Cecil Wray Dalton, born 1806 in Copgrove; died 14 Jun 1888.

v.   Esther Jane Dalton, born 1807.

vi.  John Dalton, born 1808; died 1854.

vii. Elizabeth Dalton, born 1809.

viii. Charles James Dalton, born 13 May 1812; died 07 Nov 1880.

 

Generation No. 12

 

12. Mary Ann Norcliffe was born 09 Dec 1786 in Of Langton, York, England, and died 17 Mar 1837. She married Dr. Charles Best 07 Jun 1807. He was born 05 Feb 1779 in Of York, and died 30 Jul 1817.

     

Child of Mary Norcliffe and Dr. Best is:

 

i.    Rosemond Best, born 31 Jul 1808; died 19 Aug 1881.

 

John Dalton III was born 1784 in Of Fillingham Castle, and died 01 Jul 1864 in Brighton. He married (1) Eizabeth Lodge 1812, daughter of Richard Lodge. She was born in Of Leeds, and died 08 Oct 1900. He married (2) Catherine Dodsworth 1844.

     

Children of John Lll and Eizabeth Lodge are:

 

i.    Richard Henry Dalton, died 1890. He married Christina Leah Hatfield 1857; born in Of Thorparch Hall, Yorkshire, England.

 

ii.   Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, died 04 Nov 1854.

iii.  Gertrude Dalton. She married Frederick Thompson.

iv.  Susan Dalton. She married George Clark.

v.   Mary Sullivan Dalton. She married (1) Charles Preston 1847; died 01 Jan 1861. She married (2) Rev. Canon Fisher 18 Nov 1862 in St. George's, Hanover Square.

 

vi.  Albinia Dalton, born 1808; died 1859. She married (1) Rev. George Kelly. She married (2) Wadham Locke 1854.

 

vii. Frances Elizabeth Dalton, died 1890. She married William Henry Crompton-Stansfield 1858; died 1888.

 

viii. Isabella Dalton, died 1890.

 

ix.  John Dalton IV, born 20 May 1813 in Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 05 Sep 1871.

 

Children of John IV and Catherine Dodsworth are:

 

i.    Catherine Elizabeth Dalton. She married William Driffield 13 May 1867 in St. James, Piccadilly.

 

ii.   Charles Montaque Cecil Dalton, born in Canada.

 

 

Major Gen. Charles was born 1789 in Of Sleningford, York, England, and died 1871. He married Mary Duncan 1832.

 

Charles, captain in the royal artillery, m. in February, 1832, Mary, daughter of Dr. Duncan, M.D.

 

Child of Major Dalton and Mary Duncan is:

 

i.    James Robert Dalton, born 1838; died 1866.

 

Madeline Agnes Dalton was born 1810. She married (1) Cecil Wray Dalton Oct 1830, son of Rev. Dalton and Maria Gibson. He was born 1806 in Copgrove, and died 14 Jun 1888.

 

DALTON, CECIL WRAY. Adm. pens. (age l9 at MAGDALENE, Dec. l9, 1823. Son of James (1782. R. of Croft, Yorks (and Maria Gibson). School, Richmon d, Yorks. Matric, Michs. 1824; Scholar 1825; B.A. 1828. Ord. deacon and priest (Chester l830. V. of Grewelthorpe, Yorks, 1858-76. Married his first cousin, Madeline Agnes, and had issue. From 1876 resided at Masham, Bed ale. Died there June 14,1888, aged 82 (Charles Dalton; Scott, MSS; The

Guardian, June 20,1888; Crockford.

     

Child of Madeline Dalton and Cecil Dalton is:

 

i.    James Dalton, born 1831; died 1862 in Bournemouth.

 

Cecil Wray Dalton was born 1806 in Copgrove, and died 14 Jun 1888. He married Madeline Agnes Dalton Oct 1830, daughter of Lt. Dalton and Susanna Prescott. She was born 1810.

 

DALTON, CECIL WRAY. Adm. pens. (age l9 at MAGDALENE, Dec. l9, 1823. S on of James (1782. R. of Croft, Yorks (and Maria Gibson). School, Richmon d, Yorks. Matric, Michs. 1824; Scholar 1825; B.A. 1828. Ord. deacon and pr iest (Chester l830. V. of Grewelthorpe, Yorks, 1858-76. Married his fir st cousin, Madeline Agnes, and had issue. From 1876 resided at Masham, Bed ale. Died there June 14,1888, aged 82 (Charles Dalton; Scott, MSS; The Gua rdian, June 20,1888; Crockford.

 

Charles James Dalton was born 13 May 1812, and died 07 Nov 1880. He married Mary Norcliffe Cleghorn 1847.

 

Charles James Dalton was educated at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich and obtained a second lieutenant's commission in the Royal Artillery in 1829.

     

Children of Charles Dalton and Mary Cleghorn are:

 

i.    James Cecil Dalton, born 31 Aug 1848 in Of The Hutts, Grewelthrope, Yorkshire, England; died 12 May 1931.

 

ii.   Charles Dalton, born 25 Sep 1850; died 1932. He married Isabella Dalton Robinson 1880; died 1926.

 

Charles Dalton wrote six volume's of the "ENGLISH ARMY LISTS AND COMMISSI ON REGISTERS, 1661-1714"

 

iii.  Marie Dalton, born 1852; died 1933.

iv.  George Dalton, born 16 Feb 1854; died 02 Apr 1858.

 

Thomas Norcliffe Dalton died 04 Nov 1854. He married Fanny Gabbett 24 May 1845.

 

Notes for Thomas Norcliffe Dalton:

 

The Following obituary notice appeared in the "Illustrated London News"

 

"Major Thomas Norcliffe Dalton, of the 49th Regiment, was killed at Inkermann whilst gallanty leading his men in action, age 35. His loss is deeply deplored. The gallant Offic er was son of John Dalton, Esq. of Sleningford Park, Co. York, late a Captain in the Army; and grands on of lieut.-Colonel John Dalton, whose father, John Dalton, Esq., acquired a hugh reputation in the East India Company's service. The immediate ancestor of the family, John Dalton of Hawkenswell, who served as Lient. Colonel to his brother-in-law, the Lord Darcy, in the great Civil War, was mortally wounded on passing the bridge of Burton-upon-Trent while conducting the Queen rom Burlington to Oxford. Major Dalton served in the 61st Regiment in the Punjuab campaiges of 1848-9; and was present at the passage of the Chenab and in the battle of Sauloolspere, Chillianwallah and with the field force in puruit of the enemy in the Kyber Pass, for which he received a medal and two clasps. From the 61st he exchanged into the 49th at the Depot in Cork, in 1853 and served with the gallant Regiment ever since its arrival in the East. At the conflict of the Adens, Major Dalton whilst leading his men up the hill, had his horse shot under him; and in the hard fought affair of Balaklivi. He also took a prominent part."

 

Source: The history of the Wrays of Glentworth, 1523-1852, by Charles Dalton.

Book no. 929.242 W924d at the LDS FHL in SLC Utah.

 

49th Foot:

 

Major T. N. Dalton - killed at Inkermann - 5th November 1854, Near French camp, 49th Regt. cemetery. 'Major T.N. Dalton Fell at the battle of Inkerman while in command of HM 's 49th

     

Child of Thomas Dalton and Fanny Gabbett is:

 

i.    Rev. Norclifffe Dalton, born 1854; died 1911.

 

John Dalton IV. was born 20 May 1813 in Ripon, Yorkshire, England, and died 05 Sep 1871. He married Georgina Isabella Tower 30 Aug 1842. She died 26 May 1867.

 

Children of John IV and Georgina Tower are:

 

i.    Emma Elizabeth Dalton, died Aug 1914. She married Major Horace Craven 11 Aug 1875 in North Standley, Yorkshire, England.

 

ii.   Alice Neville Dalton, died 1918.

iii.  Georgina Isabella Dalton, born 02 Sep 1845 in Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 07 Apr 1918 in Fillingham Castle. She married Seymour Berkeley Portman 02 Jun 1880 in St. Gabriel's, Warwick Square; born 12 Jan 1838; died 19 Oct 1912.

 

iv.  John Dalton, born 1849; died 05 Apr 1887. He married Charlotte Elizabeth Elliott 18 Apr 1871 in St. George's, Hanover Square, London; died 23 Dec 1895.

 

James Cecil Dalton was born 31 Aug 1848 in Of The Hutts, Grewelthrope, Yorkshire, England, and died 12 May 1931. He married Mary Caroline Barker 30 Oct 1899.

 

King's College London

Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives

 

Survey of the Papers of Senior UK Defense Personnel, 1900-1975

Name

 

DALTON, James Cecil (1848-1931), Major General

Service biography

 

Commissioned Royal Artillery 1869; Afghanistan 1880; Staff College 1882; Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General, Gibraltar and Cork, Ireland 1883-1887; Staff Capt and Deputy Assistant Adjutant General, Topogra phical Section, Intelligence Div, War Office 1887-1892; Special Service Officer, Army Headquarters 1894-1895; Assistant Military Secretary, Army Headquarters 1899-1901; Col on Staff, Commander Royal Artillery, Western District 1901-1904; General Officer Commanding, Royal Artillery, Gibraltar 190 5-1906; Inspector, Royal Garrison Artillery 1906-1910; retired 1910; Col Commandant, Royal Artillery 1920

 

Children of James Dalton and Mary Barker are:

 

i.    Mary Frances Helena Dalton, born 04 Nov 1900.

ii.   Sir Charles James George Dalton, born 28 Feb 1902 in Of The Hutts, Grewelthrope, Yorkshire, England.

iii.  John Cecil D'arcy Dalton, born 1907; died 15 Nov 1981 in Hauxwell Hall, Leyburn, Yorkshire.

 

 

 

Generation No. 14

 

14. Rev. Norcliffe was born 1854, and died 1911. He married Agatha Harriet Jennings. She was born in Of Adelaide, South Australia.

 

Children of Rev. Dalton and Agatha Jennings are:

 

i.    Isabella Francis Dalton.

ii.   Violet Mary Dalton.

iii.  Joan Neval Dalton.

iv.  Irena Dalton.

v.   John Henry Dalton, born 05 Apr 1889.

 

Alice Neville Dalton died 1918. She married Lt. Col. Jemmett Duke 07 Oct 1886.

 

Child of Alice Dalton and Lt. Duke is:

 

i.    Mary Georgina Duke.

 

Sir Charles James George Dalton was born 28 Feb 1902 in The Hutts, Grewelthrope, Yorkshire, England. He married Daphne Evans. Major General Sir Charles Dalton served in India.

 

Commander Royal Artillery 26th Indian Division, Burma

Brigadier General Staff XXXIII Indian Corps, Burma

1944 - 1945

Commander Royal Artillery 14th Indian Division, Burma

1949 - 1951

Commanding Officer 8th Anti-Aircraft Brigade

1951 - 1954

Services Relations Adviser to United Kingdom High Commissioner Control Commission for Germany

1954 - 1957

Director of Manpower Planning, War Office

1957

 

Child of Sir Dalton and Daphne Evans is:

 

i.    John Charles Tyndall Dalton.

 

John Cecil D'arcy Dalton was born 1907, and died 15 Nov 1981 in Hauxwell Hall, Leyburn, Yorkshire. He married Pamela Frances Segrave.

 

Notes for John Cecil D'arcy Dalton:

 

Survey of the Papers of Senior UK Defense Personnel, 1900-1975

DALTON, John Cecil D'Arcy (1907-1981), Major General

 

Service biography

Commissioned, Royal Artillery 1926; Staff College 1939; World War II 1939- 1945; France and Flanders 1940; North Africa 1942-1943; attached to 2 Canadian Army Group Royal Artillery, Feb-Dec 1944; Chief of Staff, British Commonwealth Forces, Korea 1952-1954; Maj. Gen in charge of Administration, General Headquarters Far East Land Forces 1957-1959; Director of Quartering, War Office 1959-1960; Vice Quartermaster General, War Office 1960-196 2; retired 1962

 

IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM, LONDON: Copy papers 1942-1947 (ref: 91/8/1), including; notes on logistics of Tunis landing 1942-1943; memos on administration and Operation HUSKY, Sicily 1943; official war diary of 15 Medium Regt. Royal Artillery, Jul-Dec 1944; copy of an article by Dalton, 'Under Canadian Command', published in the Royal Artillery War Commemoration Book, a so related correspondence with Brig William Edmonstone Duncan 1947; correspondence relating to Canadian Gunnery, World War II

     

Children of John Dalton and Pamela Segrave are:

 

i.    James William Dalton.

ii.   Richard John

Generation No. 15

 

15. James William Dalton; He married Julia.

     

Children of James Dalton and Julia are:

 

i.    Thomas John Dalton, born 21 Mar 1971.

ii.   Clare Frances Dalton, born 04 Jan 1974 in Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire Co. England.

iii.  George James Dalton, born 30 Oct 1977.

 

Richard John Dalton; He married (1) Elizabeth Mary Kearys. He married (2) Mary Bodell, daughter of James Bodell and Laurine Lee.

     

Child of Richard Dalton and Elizabeth Kearys is:

 

i.    William Richard Dalton, born 21 Mar 1918.

 

And so this end the pedigree section of this history. There is some repeats in the history below that I have not edited.

 

Family history compiled by Lucy Henderson Horton

 

Dalton Coat of Arms:

 

Amrs-Az., a semee of cross-crose-crosslets, or, a lion rampant; arg.^ a chief bary ne bulee of three of the last and sa; crest, a dragon's head with wings displayed vert., the outside of the wings or, garged with a collar, nebutee of the last.

 

Motto: "The character of the just shall stand."

 

Authorities on Dalton: Vols. I and II, Ancestral Records and Portraits, which contain the pedigree of persons composing the first chapter of Colonial Dames in America (John Dalton's record is taken from one of these books); the works of A. G. Salley, Jr., Secretary of Historical Commission of South Carolina (Columbia, S. C.), whose works comprise many volumes under head of South Carolina Historical Collection. There are numerous pages in several volumes under heads of Land Grants; Letters of John Dalton; Warrants for Land, etc., referring to Dalton family; Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton's record filed in the library of the Missouri Historical Society at St. Louis; Meade's Old Families and Churches of Virginia; Burke's Landed Gentry; Burke's Peerage; Original Fairfax County, Va., Records; old family papers in the hands of the writer; Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine for October, 1916, pages 239-245.

We refer people interested in tracing ancestry of American families to a collection of ninety folio volumes of more than four hundred pages each, compiled by Col. Joseph Lemuel Chester. These volumes are extracts from parish registers. The English were so grateful to Cok Chester for his genealogical work in compiling "The Marriage, Baptismal and Burial Registers of the Collegiate Church, or Abbey of St. Peter. Westminster" that they made Col. Chester one of the four Americans to whom they have placed memorials in Westminster Abbey.

 

The name Dalton in the days of William the Conqueror was written D'Alton. Yorkshire fell to the lot of Count D'Alton, one of the henchmen of William the Conqueror. From Count D'Alton the American family of Dalton descends (see Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton's family record filed in the library of the Missouri Historical Society in St. Louis).

 

Records of the Dalton family Bible, formerly belonging to Catherine Dalton, daughter of Capt. John Dalton and his wife. Jemima Shaw, of Alexandria, Virginia: and wife of Wm. Bird. This Bible was destroyed during the Civil war. It carried the pedigree back to a younger bunch of the family of which Sir John Dalton was the head, and was long established in England.

 

Investigations by Hon. William L. Yancev (grandson of Catherine Dalton and her husband. William Bird), who was familiar with the Dalton Bible; and later research by others of family, substantially these Bible records, and show that John Dalton and Wm. Dalton, first of the name in Virginia, were of the younger branch of the Dalton family of York county, England; and that the elder line had become extinct during the life of John Dalton, the colonist.

 

The head of the Daltons in Hanxwell county, York, was Colonel John Dalton, fifth in descent from John Dalton who was settled in Kingston-upon-Hull in 1458; and was a son of Sir William, who was Knighted at Whitehall April 28, 1629.

 

Sir William Dalton died in 1649, and was buried in York Minster. Col. John Dalton married Hon. Dorothy, daughter of Sir Conyers Darcy under whom Dalton was Lieutenant Colonel. He was wounded July 5. 1643, while conducting Queen Henrietta Maria from Birdlington to Oxford. He died of his wound in July, 1644, and is buried at York Minster The elder line of his descendants became extinct in 1792 upon 'he death of Francis, his great-grandson, and the title reverted to one of the younger sons of Col. John Dalton.

 

We throw in, by way of parenthesis, the statement that in 1844 John Dalton of this house married a young daughter of Sir Charles Dodsworth (see Burke's Landed Gentry).

 

The colonists, John and William Dalton, brothers, came to America between 1685 and 1690, settling first in Gloucester county, Va. Some of this family later settled in Westmoreland county Va., before 1722, and still later we find that they shared the restless spirit of the day, some of them settling in the vicinity of Goochland county, Virginia. A kinsman of these two men, Philemon Dalton by name, had come to America in 1635 and settled in New England at Dedham.

 

We have some record of Tristram Dalton, a descendant of Philemon Dalton, who came to Dedham in 1635. Philemon Dalton had four or five children, John, William, Michail, Margaret; etc. Tristam Dalton, son of Michail Dalton and his wife, Mary Little Dalton, was born at Newbury, Mass., May 28, 1738. He graduated in the class at Harvard with John Adams. He studied law in Salem; and revised the public school system in Newbury. In 1774 he was delegate to the Provincial Congress; in 1776 was elected Representative of the court. He supported Continental Government in Revolutionary war. In 1815 he was surveyor of the Port of Boston. He married in 1758 Ruth Hooper, daughter of a rich merchant of Marblehead. They had five children. He died at Boston, May) 30, 1817. He had had the honor of being on the committee to receive George Washington when he was first inducted into office as President of the United States. A son of this man. who bore his father's name, Tristram Dalton, was induced by George Washington to invest in property about what is now Washington City. This did not prove for him a successful financial venture. Tristram Dalton was chosen vestryman of Fairfax Church, Fairfax Parish, Fairfax county, in 1789 (see page 268, Vol. I, Meade's Old Families and Churches of Virginia).

 

Old family papers prove that Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) of Mayo river, Rockingham county, North Carolina, and John Dalton of the Firm of Carlyle and Dalton in Alexandria, Va., were brothers. They were children of William Dalton, the colonist, who came first to Glouchester county, Virginia. Another son of Wm. Dalton was Robert Dalton; and a daughter of Robert was Agatha Dalton, who married James Mitchell, Nov. 25, 1768.

 

Captain John Dalton (1722-1777)

 

John Dalton was the youngest child of William Dalton, of Gloucester County, Va., who died sometime before 1733. John Dalton's oldest brother was Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), of Rockingham county, North Carolina

 

John Dalton was a member of the firm of Carlyle and Dalton. They did an extensive business, and both built homes which still stand, landmarks in old Alexandria, Va. (1917). John Carlyle's house is what is now familiarly known to us as the Braddock House, John Dalton's home stands a few steps from the Carlyle home. These two houses we're among the most imposing residences in colonial Virginia. The Dalton-Herbert home is four stories high, as is also the Carlyle house. The Dalton-Herbert home is so called because the house was inherited by John Daltons daughter, Jennie, who married William Herbert. We will say in passing that they were parents of Noblet Herbert, whose two children are buried at Mt. Vernon.

 

John Dalton, of Alexandria, Virginia, was born in 1722 and died in 1777. He was one of the founders of the town of Belhaven. He was vestryman of Old Christ Church, serving with George Washington, John Shaw, and John Carlyle. The latter was his partner in business.

 

John Dalton was a member of the Fairfax County Committee of Safety, 1774-1775, when George Washington was chairman of this committee.

 

John Dalton was one of the founders of Alexandria in 1749 as was also Carlyle. The wife of John Carlyle was Sarah Fairfax, daughter of William Fairfax, who was grandson of Lord Culpeper.

 

He also completed Christ Church when the contractor defaulted. Among his descendants is Mrs. Burton Harrison, whose delightful Belhaven Tales give so true a picture of Alexandria life during the first half of the nineteenth century. In 1774 the city Alexandria was the most important port in northern Virginia.

 

John Dalton was chosen vestryman along with George Washington on March 28, 1765. In Meade's Old Families and Churches of Virginia, page 270, where copy is made from Sparks' Life of Washington, we find Fairfax vestry, chosen March 28, 1765, the following, with votes given: John West, votes 340; John Alexander, votes 309; William Payne, votes 301; John Dalton, votes 281; George Washington, votes 274, etc.

 

After John Dalton's death in 1777. John Carlyle was the guardian of first two daughters . These two daughters, Catherine and Jennie Dalton, made their home, after their father's death, with their guardian, John Carlyle.

 

John Dalton, his wife, and two daughters, Jennie and Catherine, shared in these festivities. John Dalton's wife died in 1765.

 

Jennie Dalton, daughter of John Dalton and his wife, Jemima Shaw, married William Herbert. Two of their grandchildren were taken suddenly ill while on a visit to Mt. Vernon and died there. Tradition says they died of diphtheria. Both were quite young. These two Herbert children were buried at Mt. Vernon. Their father was Noblet Herbert. He married again, in 1819, Mary Lee Washington, who died in 1827. She was the fourthchild of Corbin Washington, the son of John Augustus Washington and Mary Ball.

 

The only other surviving child of John Dalton and his wife, Jemima Shaw, was Catherine Dalton, who married William Bird in 1781, the wedding taking place at "Cameron," near Alexandria, as stated in the family Bible.

 

Samuel Dalton (1699-1802)

 

Samuel Dalton was the oldest child of William Dalton of Gloucester county, Virginia, who died some time before 1733. The youngest child in this family was John Dalton (1722-1777) who lived in Alexandria, Va.

 

The colonist, John Dalton, and his brother, Wm. Dalton, came to America between 1685 and 1690, settling first in Gloucester county, Virginia. Some of this family later settled in Westmoreland county before 1722, and still later we find that they showed the restless spirit of the day and had settled in the vicinity of Goochland county, Va. Samuel Dalton was of an enterprising nature, and, after his marriage to Anne Dandridge Redd, he moved" to Orange county, Va., and "lived, when a young man, in the vicinity of the elder James Madison, father of our President," we are told in manuscript written by Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton, a great-grandson of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802). Dr. R. H. Dalton was born at the home of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) several years after the death of his great-grandfather. I will later give Dr. Dalton's manuscript in full. Dr. Dalton says that Madison and Dalton were intimate friends; and that this was proved by the many old letters from the elder Jas. Madison to Samuel Dalton, which Dr. R. H. Dalton had read. These letters belonged to Dr. Dalton's aunt, Mary (Dalton) Hughes of Patrick county, Va., a daughter of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802).

 

Samuel Dalton and the elder James Madison were members of the Loyal Land Company, and invested extensively in lands in Western Virginia and North Carolina (see History of Southwestern Virginia). By referring to page 48, etc., of History of Southwestern Virginia, by Thos. Preston Summers, it can be seen that this was first called The Loyal Company in 1749; and that later on it was known as The Loyal Land Company. This land company consisted of forty-two gentlemen. Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) and John Hughes, a brother of Col. Archelaus Hughes, were members.

 

The Loyal Land Company had two grants of land, one of one hundred and twenty thousand acres and another grant of eight hundred thousand acres, making in all nine hundred and twenty thousand acres of land.

 

Samuel Dalton saw the light of three centuries. He was born in 1699, and died at his home on beautiful Mayo river in Rockingham county, North Carolina, in 1802.

 

Before finally settling down in Rockingham county, this man had been lured by the possibilities of Georgia, and carried his family to what is now Savannah, Georgia,  then simply in its incipiency as a town. Here he lost a bright child, and there was much sickness in his family. Afraid of the miasma, he retraced his steps, thinking to return to Virginia. Dalton built a commodious house, which for many years we know was painted in Spanish-brown, overlooking the beautiful Mayo- river, above its juncture with the Dan river and near where is now Madison, N. C. He thought he was in Virginia, but when the boundary line was made, his home fell in North Carolina. Other members of this family connection moved to Wilkes county, Georgia, Waltons, Clarkes. etc. The writer holds letters written by some of them and a note written by Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) himself. The penmanship is so good that "he who runs may read." This note is written to his son-in-law, Col. Archelaus Hughes, and the father assures Col. Hughes that he and his son, John Dalton, will see that the money is paid back. The business paper reads as follows:

"We, Samuel and John Dalton, do agree to pay to Archelaus Hughes, or his assigns, the amount of a Bond due from Wm. Dalton to the said Hughes, on or before the 25th day of December.

 

 

"Witness our hands this 9th June, 1796, Samuel Dalton, John Dalton."

 

This note was written by men whose "word was as good as their bond." The writer, in studying the descendants of Samuel Dalton (1(599-1802), finds many men and women of whom this may be said. We agree with Burns when he says that "An honest man ... is King of men."

 

Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton in his manuscript says that Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) was the wealthiest man in all the Piedmont region of Virginia and North Carolina. His home, in which his sons and daughters grew to manhood and womanhood, was noted for its hospitality. Here congenial spirits met. Here was lived that life which Thos. Nelson Page says "is believed by some to have been the sweetest, purest and most beautiful life ever lived." We quote again from the same authority in describing the old-time Southern hospitality: "The constant intercourse of the neighborhood, with its perpetual round of dinners, teas and entertainments, was supplemented by visits -of friends and relatives from other sections, who came with their families, their equipages, and personal servants to spend a month or two, or as long a time as they pleased. A dinner invitation was not so designated. It was with exactitude termed 'spending the day.' On Sundays everyone invited everyone else from church, and there would be long lines of carriages passing in at the open gate."

 

One wonders what formed topics of conversation. Our same authority says: "The conversation was surprising. It was of the crops, the roads, politics, mutual friends, including the entire field of neighborhood matters, related, not as gossip, but as affairs of common interest, which everyone knew, or was expected or entitled to know. The fashions came in, of course, among the ladies, embracing particularly 'patterns.' Politics took the place of honor among the gentlemen, their range embracing not only state and national politics, but British as well, and to which they possessed astonishing knowledge, interest in English matters having been handed down from father to son as a class test."

 

Samuel Dalton's (1699-1805) daughter, Letitia married Matthew Redd Moore, a son of William Moore, of Albemarle county, Virginia, a family noted in early Virginia history.

 

The writer has in her possession old business papers of William Moore, of Albemarle county, Virginia. These papers are dropping apart with age. William Moore was a son of Bernard Moore, who married Ann Catherine, daughter of Governor Alexander Spottswood. Gov. Spottswood lived in Orange county, Virginia, which adjoins Albemarle. Another son of Bernard Moore was John, who married Ann Dandridge. This Ann Dandridge was closely related to Ann Dandridge Redd, who married Samuel Dalton (1699-1805).

 

Samuel Moore married a kinswoman, Elizabeth Gaines, sister of Etlmund Pendleton Gaines,

 

Samuel Dalton in 1740 married Anne Redd, or, as she was often called "Nancy," which is another form of the name Anne. She was so called in order to distinguish her name from her mother's name—Anne (Dandridge) Redd.

 

Anne (Dandridge) Redd, mother of Nancy (Redd) Dalton, was a daughter of Sir William Lionel Rufus de Redd and his wife, Catherine Moore. Sir Wm. Lionel Rufus de Redd came to America with Alexander Spottswood. He renounced his title, dropping the "de" from his name, and married Catherine Moore, a kinswoman of Gov. Spottswood. Anne Dandridge Redd was a cousin of Anne (Dandridge) Moore, whose husband was John Moore, a son of Bernard Moore and his wife, Anne Catherine, eldest daughter of Gov. Alexander Spottswood. Alexander Spottswood's wife was a niece and ward of James Butler, Duke of Bernard Moore was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1744. He was one of the "Knights of Golden Horseshoe," who went over the Blue Ridge Mountains in 1716. There have been many intermarriages between the descendants of Bernard Moore and the Dalton and Hughes families. The writer has autograph letters written by Susan (Martin) Moore, whose husband was a brother of Elizabeth Gaines' husband, to her brother, Gen. William Martin of Williamson county Tenn. These letters prove her a cultured and sympathetic woman, a devoted sister. Her husband was a son of Matthew Redd Moore and his wife, Letitia (Dalton) Moore. She, herself, was a granddaughter of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) through his daughter, Rachel Dalton Martin.

 

Samuel Dalton married Anne Dandridge Redd in 1740 and they had the following children:

 

David; lived in Stokes county, North Carolina.

Samuel Jr.; lived in Rockingham county, North Carolina; married Nancy Kenner,

Robert; lived in Campbell county, Va.

William; lived in Virginia.

John; lived in North Carolina.

Mary; born 1748, married Col. Archelaus Hughes, of Patrick county, Va.

Letitia; married Col. Matthew Moore, of Stokes county, N. C.

Rachel; married Capt. (and Rev.) William Martin; lived at Snow Creek, Stokes county, N. C.

Jane; married Major Joseph Winston, of Stokes county, N. C, March 24, 1769.

Matilda; married Capt. Jonathan Hanby; lived in Charleston S. C. Virginia

 

The daughters of the home on Mayo river all married men who became soldiers in the Revolutionary war. They were officers in the American army.

 

Mary Dalton, daughter of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), and his wife, Ann Dandridge-Redd, of Rockingham county, N. C., was born in 1748, and died in 184L She was married to Col. Archelaus; Hughes of Pittsylvania county, Sept. 25, 1769.

 

Mary (Dalton) Hughes was a woman of buoyant nature. Cheerfulness characterized the whole of her long life of ninety-three years. Her youngest child, Madison Redd Hughes, whom the writer knew long and well, said that she was always addressed and spoken of as "Madame Hughes." We find this to have been the case with a family connection of later date, Octavia Walton LeVert was always spoken of as "Madame LeVert."

 

Mary Dalton Hughes had a good deal of pride, and was given to playful banter. On one occasion the elder Wade Hampton was visiting in her home, and a flock of guineas were making a great noise. Mr. Hampton said: "Madame Hughes; order those fowls killed." In a playful way he continued: "I who command am a Congressman of the United States." With a proud toss of the head she rejoined: "I who refuse am Madame Hughes of 'Hughesville.'

 

 

Obituary of Mary (Dalton) Huglies (1748-1841).

 

"Departed this life on the 30th day of December, 1841, at her residence in Patrick county, Virginia, of chesmber rheumatism, the venerable Mrs. Mary Hughes, relict of Col. Archelaus Hughes, in the ninety-fourth year of her age. Apart from the extreme age to which if pleased Kind Providence to prolong the life of Madame Hughes, she may truly be said to have possessed very many of the most remarkable and excellent traits of the human character.

 

"Her life began before the existence of this Government, and consequently she witnessed in its most destructive ravages the horrors of the Revolutionary war, and felt its effects on her immediate circle. The brave old soldier, with whom she had linked her earthly fortune, was absent in that momentous struggle in his country's service, and while his safety was the dearest object of her solicitation, the glory and success of her country's arms were never lost sight of. During the struggle she imbibed a spirit of patriotism, which to the last day of her existence, like her other personalities, of the highest, was not in the slightest degree diminished, and which to her many admirers has been a source of peculiar interest.

 

"Kind to the human family with almost a universal benevolence. she dispensed alms in the true spirit of charity. From her lips no account of self-claimed merit was ever heard. To speak of her and to do her justice is the delight of her many relatives and friends who thronged around her and sweetened the gloom of her declining years. To portray adequately the cardinal virtues of her remarkable character is more than at present 1 shall attempt to do.

 

While Mary (Dalton) Hughes was a devoted mother to all of her children, there was something especially touching about the devotion of son and mother in the case of Col. Samuel Hughes. ' This son had had a sorrow which he could never forget. His fiancé lost her life in the famous theatre fire in Richmond in 1811. After this great sorrow he seemed to lavish a double portion of love on his mother. Their devotion was a thing so beautiful that to this good, day some of the family still hang on their walls the pictures of mother and son, side by side.

 

It is generally conceded that the Welsh family of Hughes of Pow-hatan and Goochland counties, Virginia, were of royal descent. Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton in his family papers says that Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) was the brother of an English lord. We know that it is a well-founded tradition that Samuel Dalton's wife was known as "Lady Dalton" among her descendants in Virginia and the Western States. We quote Judge Arch M. Hughes of Columbia, Tenn., as one authority for this assertion. Judge Hughes was born in Stokes county,

North Carolina, near the home of his lineal ancestor, Samuel Dalton (1699- 1802), of Rockingham county, N. C

 

We will copy extracts from Dr. Dalton's paper: "The name Dalton is Norman-French. The English progenitor is said to have come over from Normandy with William the Conqueror. . . In time it came to be an extensive family in both England and Ireland, and now many branches are living in America.

 

Dr. Dalton speaks of a Lord John Dalton, a dissolute man, who was an uncle of his great-grandfather, Samuel Dalton (1699-1802). He speaks of two brothers coming to America. These brothers were William and John. One brother, he says, settled in New Jersey and the other in Virginia. William Dalton. we know, settled in Gloucester county, Va. He speaks of one of Samuel Dalton's brothers settling in Alexandria, Virginia. This was John Dalton of the business firm Carlyle & Dalton.

 

"Samuel Dalton (1699-1805) lived for many years in the vicinity of the elder Jas. Madison, and had much to do with the family, as I have seen by reading over a large bundle of papers in possession of Aunt Mary (Dalton) Hughes of Patrick county, Va., whom I was In the habit of visiting in my boyhood, and after I became a physician.

 

"From Virginia he moved to Georgia and settled the very place now occupied by Savannah, but after living there a few years and finding the country very unhealthy, having lost several of his family, he was on his way back to Virginia, when he was induced to purchase a large body of land on Mayo river, Rockingham county, North Carolina, about ten miles above the present village of Madison at the junction of Mayo and Dan rivers, where he lived during the balance of his life, one hundred and six years. He became the wealthiest man in al! the country, and raised a large family of children and owned a great many negroes.

 

"I was born and reared within five miles of his residence, and I well remember, not only the large plantation, which he cultivated, but the very house in which he lived in his latter days. It was a large frame house on a hill, overlooking the beautiful Mayo river. He died but a short time before my birth. He was active and erect as long as he lived, and in his latter days generally walked with his hands behind him. For many years before his death he refused to ride horseback or in any vehicle, and sometimes during the year in which he died he walked five miles to my father's, and back again, without any very great fatigue or injury.

 

"When a child, I remember the great respect and reverence with which the old people spoke of him. He had several sons of whom I knew: David, a man of large wealth in Stokes county. North Carolina: Robert, of Campbell county, Virginia; and William, who also lived somewhere in Virginia. He had many daughters of whom I well remember Mary Hughes, of Patrick county, Virginia, wife of Colonel Archelaus Hughes, a distinguished man; Letitia (Letty) Moore, wife of Colonel Moore, of Stokes county. North Carolina, who were the father and mother of Gabriel Moore, once Governor of Alabama and later a senator in congress; Matilda Hanby. wife of Capt. Hanby, one of Marion's right hand men, whose name is mentioned honorably in history; Virginia Handby, wife of Capt. Handby's brother, and two or three others whose names I have forgotten, one of these was the wife of Col. Hughes' brother, and lived and died in Surrey county, North Carolina; another, a Col. Moore, who lived and died near Ward's Gap, Patrick county, Virginia; and one who married a man named Winston in Stokes county, North Carolina (a marginal note says that Matthew Hughes of Surrey and Col. Moore near Ward's Gap belonged to the next generation).

 

"All of these left large posterity, many of them of whom I have seen and many of whom have been dear to me as relatives. And right here I will take occasion to say, in all truth, that in the immense posterity of Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, 1 have never known or heard of scarcely any crime or rascality committed by any of them equal to families generally.

 

"The third son of Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, was Samuel Dalton, my grandfather, who lived and died, at the age of thirty, on Beaver Island, where I was born. He died from the effect of a rattlesnake bite. His death when so young was much regretted by his family and friends, as he was a very promising, energetic man; and without accident was likely to live to great old age, like his father who lived to be one hundred and six years old. In 1835 1 saw Aunt (Mary Dalton) Hughes at her own house, at the age of ninety-eight, when she was as young looking as average women are at forty, and she scarcely had a wrinkle in her face. Her mind was then active and vigorous. She was straight and her gait was like that of a girl. In fact, she looked handsome, except that her eyes had a hard unearthly appearance. The other long-lived sisters were healthy looking, but quite wrinkled."

 

Dr. Dalton did not have the age of Mary (Dalton) Hughes exact. She was born in 1748, and died in 1841.

 

We will copy a letter written by Dr. Dalton in 1896 to his niece, Mrs. Bettie Kennedy of "Daltonia Farms," Houstonville, North Carolina. This letter gives us information of Samuel Dalton's (1699-1805) immediate descendants.

 

"My Dear Bettie: Our genealogy is a matter that has always interested me very deeply, but since 1 have been quite old and so far separated from any of my relations of my generation, and indeed of the succeeding one, I seem to have lost interest in it. However, my memory of facts is by no means impaired.

 

"Generations beginning with Samuel Dalton (1699-1805): Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, died about the beginning of the present century, perhaps in 1801 or '02. . . He settled on a plantation adjoining the elder James Madison and lived here for several years, during which time, I learned by perusing papers, left by him in possession of his daughter, Mary Dalton Hughes, of Patrick county, Virginia, that he had many important transactions with Mr. Madison. They were both members of the once celebrated Loyal Land Company, with thirty-eight % others, who were granted a large territory over the Blue Ridge, embracing many counties. And when he sold out and went to the Georgia territory, he assigned his stock to Mr. Madison, as a mere agency, as seemed very probable, inasmuch as the land at that time had assumed little or no value, nor did it improve during his life. But while I was a young physician in Quilford county, North Carolina, happening to read in 1828 an advertisement in the Richmond Inquirer calling on heirs of the stockholders to assemble to make good their claim; and seeing the name of Samuel Dalton as one of the forty gentlemen, I rode up to my father's with the paper, and soon after Col. Samuel Hughes (he was a son of Mary (Dalton) Hughes) and your father went to Richmond and employed Chapman Johnson to bring suit as the transfer of stock was not for 'value received.'

 

But yet our worthy ancestor did become a very great 'land grabber,' for, while on the way back to Virginia from the swamps of Georgia with his sickly family, he halted at Mayo, North Carolina, and took up a homestead, where he prospered and finally was the owner of the best lands around in every direction, so that my father, his grandson, inherited two thousand three hundred (2,300) acres, and a number of likely negroes. These rich Hairstons bought their land of him; and every one of his children was endowed with very large tracts. He was probably the largest land holder in all the Piedmont region of Virginia and North Carolina.

 

"The children of Samuel Dalton, who died at the age of out hundred and eight years (the writer thinks he was one hundred and three years old) were four sons and six daughters: David, Robert, Samuel. William, Letitia, Matilda, Mary, Rachel, Jane,  and daughter whose name I forget, the mother of Gen. Wm. Martin of Tennessee (nicknamed Buck, who distinguished himself at the Battle of New Orleans).

 

We resume Dr. Dalton's record:

 

"Second Generation: David Dalton, son of Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, inherited the rich lands up and down Fawn Fork in Stokes county, North Carolina, where he reared his family, all known to me when a boy, and all went to Tennessee before I was grown, excepting David, whose posterity are there yet.

 

"Second Generation: Robert, son of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), settled on a large tract of land on Mayo river, adjoining his father, where he reared a son, Thomas, who reached the age of ninety-six; Elizabeth, who married Col. Critz, of the Revolution, and perhaps other children I have forgotten. A son of Thomas, ninety-one years old, is now living (1896).

 

"Second Generation: Samuel Dalton, son of Samuel Dalton (1699- 1802), of Mayo, married a Gelihu. (Note: Dr. Dalton's daughter, Mrs. Brodnax, genealogist, and his granddaughter, Mary Louise Dalton, affirm that this Samuel Dalton married a Miss Ewell. She was closely related to the ancestor of Gen. Jas. Ewell Brown Stuart. The writer has an autographed letter written by Archibald Stuart, father of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, to her grandfather, Capt. John Hughes 1776-1860). This letter was written in 1829).

 

"Samuel Dalton, after marriage, settled on Beaver Island Creek, where I was born. Aunt Molly Hughes always spoke of him as the most sprightly of her father's sons, and even at her age of ninety-eight years she seemed to grieve at his untimely death, from the effects of a snake bite. His sons were John, Nicholas, William, Samuel and Ewell. His daughters were Nancy, Elizabeth and Mary.

 

"Third Generation: John Dalton, son of Samuel Dalton, married a Gentry, and had a son, Madison, and two daughters whom 1 knew when we were small children before they went to Tennessee to live.

 

"John Dalton was a tall and well-proportioned man, the noblest- looking man I ever saw. (He was Mrs. Bettie Kennedy's grandfather).

 

"Third Generation: Nicholas, son of Samuel Dalton, II., my father, was five feet, eleven inches high, and a man of gigantic strength. He lived a life of ease and comfort and died of paralysis in 1868, while 1 was living in Alabama. He left a large estate to twelve of his children, I being disinherited on account of my absence, I suppose, and the influence of nurses over his weakened mind. But I never held him accountable for the deed. On the contrary, I have ever regarded him as the best specimen of human character I have ever known. He never had an enemy in all his life, and all his neighbors seemed to worship him. As the senior magistrate of Rockingham, he held the county courts as judge as long as he lived. His children were: Samuel S., Jane H., Mary H., Charlotte G., Ewell G., Leander, Robert H., Nancy K., Elizabeth, John, Nicholas, Susan S., and Pleasant H.

 

"I will now return to the second generation, children of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), of Mayo. I have already mentioned David, Robert, Samuel, and his posterity.

 

"Second Generation: William, I think, settled in Kentucky territory and founded a family there, prominent to this day, two of whom I know, Dr. Samuel Dalton of the U. S. army and his Brother, William, a commission merchant of New Orleans. Dr. Samuel and I could not determine whether the Kentucky William, his ancestor, was a son of Samuel, of Mayo, or his brother who settled in the Winchester Valley, while the third brother lived at Alexandria, Virginia, and was the great-grandfather of William Yancey, the prominent lawyer and politician of Alabama when the Civil war begun in 1861.

 

"Second Generation: Letitia was the wife of Col. Moore, of Stokes county, North Carolina, and the mother of Gabriel Moore, Governor of Alabama, a very wealthy farmer. Gabriel was a senator in congress in 1825, or '26. He removed to Texas, where he died. Aunt Letitia reared a large family of sons and daughters, all of whom were highly respected and most of whom I knew.

 

"Second Generation: Matilda, daughter of Samuel Dalton (1699- 1802), of Mayo, was the wife of Capt. Hanby, of Patrick county, Va., or just over the Stokes line in North Carolina. He was General Marion's right-hand man during the Revolution, and became an historical character.

 

"Second Generation: Jane Dalton married the Captain's brother, living in the same neighborhood. They had no children. (Note by author: Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton in his paper, which was written in 1868 and filed in the archives of the Missouri Historical Society in St. Louis states the fact that one of Samuel Dalton's (1699-1802) daughters was the wife of Major Joseph Winston, of King's Mountain fame. The writer has much proof that this was true. She thinks the name of Major Joseph Winston's wife was Jane)

 

"Second Generation: Mary Dalton, daughter of Samuel, of Mayo, was the wife of Colonel Archelaus Hughes, of Patrick coi.nty, Virginia. Col. Hughes carried his wife to Philadelphia, where he held a government position under General George Washington. She figured in the best society, proving herself a most accomplished woman. When I left North Carolina in 1835, where I had been her doctor for several years, she was ninety years old and, but for the "arcus senile" (white spot in the eyes), she seemed not to be more than seventy years old. Every one of the four sisters lived to be nearly one hundred years old, and all were wealthy but one. That generation of the Hughes family were numerous, and all were sprightly and intellectual. I was much among them until I was a practicing physician, and left the country.

 

"I will now revert to the heirs of Samuel Dalton, my grandfather. Samuel was next to my father, a man of ordinary size, with short, powerful arms and wonderful agility. He was periodically intemperate. And in those times of fisticuff manhood, when he went to a public gathering, he was very apt to tackle some notorious bully and come off badly bunged up, but always victorious, his adversary having cried out 'Enough!' I witnessed his last fight at Jennings, when sleet was covering the ground. His antagonist was Len Joice, a tall, powerful bully, who had never cried 'Enough.' They began at the yard gate, twenty yards above the store, and struggled for half an hour or more down the slope.. The man cried out: Take him off!' when his eyes were nearly gouged out, and his shirt being scraped off by the ice. His br.ck was skinned and covered with blood and icy mud. Uncle Sam was lifted to Jenning's house, where he laid a week before he could go home. He married a Scales and reared a family of worthy children. At the age of forty-seven he abandoned whiskey, married a second wife, a widow Moore of Stokes, but lived only a few more years. When sober, he was really a model of fine manhood, and a most excellent gentleman; and, although occasionally intemperate, he was always full-handed and independent. Uncles William and Ewell both went to the Mississippi territory before I was born. The former reared a family of children, but the latter had none. This must be nearly a correct history of our ancestry on the Dalton side, from Samuel of Mayo to our own period.

 

"I have an abundance of legendary evidence showing conclusively that the Daltons in England, from the time of William the Conqueror, have accomplished much and occupied respectable, and some of them very honorable, standing in Yorkshire and other parts of Britain.

 

"The records left with Aunt Molly Hughes, which I carefully read, show that the English law of 'primo geniture' was the cause of three junior sons coming to America. The estate in Yorkshire fell to John, the eldest son, who was a dissolute, heartless bachelor. So the younger brothers left the home of their father to seek their fortune in America. Finally the besotted bachelor, occupant of Dalton Hall, soon ran his race, leaving the estate escheated to the crown.

 

"A large number of Yorkshire Daltons colonized Ireland about the 12th or 13th century, and held their own well until they were subdued by King William of Orange.

 

"I perceive that I have omitted to notice my father's sisters. Nancy wife of Absolem Scales, had a large family of sons and daughters, they lived on Mayo, occupying the same place, a beautiful situation, where Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, had lived so long. They went to Tennessee in 1815. Their children were sprightly. (Note by author: One of this name, Alfred M. Scales, was Governor of North Carolina, 1885-87).

 

"Our family went by the name of D'Alton for a long time after the advent of William the Conqueror, and Yorkshire fell to the lot of Count D'Alton, one of his henchmen."

 

Those who care to look further into the Dalton English records will find much information in Burke's Landed Gentry, as well as in Burke's Peerage. We note that Sir William Dalton, who was Knighted at Whitehall. April 28, 1629, lies buried in York Minster. We see, too, that Dalton Hall, spoken of by Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton, near Burton, Westmoreland, which adjoins Yorkshire, is in possession of someone whose name is not Dalton.

 

Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), because of his vast estate in lands and slaves, was known as "Samuel Dalton of Mayo." Dr. Dalton always designates him by this title.

 

We will copy a notice of the death of Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton (1806-1900) from whom we have aid in our family history. This little sketch was published in the Tacoma Evening News, Washington, Jan. 22, 1900:

 

"Passes on to His Last Rest"

 

"Death of Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton (1806-1900). Close of a brilliant and remarkable career, extending over seventy years. The day before his demise, at the age of ninety-three years and eleven months, he penned his own epitaph:

 

'All you who come my grave to see 
Just as I am so you must be,
 
Once I lived and moved in space.
 
And felt the joys that charm our race,
 
But now I lie beneath the sod,
 
My body dust, my soul with God.'
 

 

'The day before his death, at nearly ninety-four years of age, Dr. Dalton, a retired physician who resided a number of years in Tacoma, penned these lines, and then awaited the call that he felt was coming.

 

"Dr. Dalton was in many respects a remarkable man. For more than sixty years he had pursued a brilliant and active professional life, and up to within a few weeks of his death was engaged in writing articles which had been accepted by prominent medical journals to which he was a constant contributor. Graduating from the medical college at Lexington, Kentucky, at the age of twenty-two years, he took a course at Philadelphia and then entered on the active practice of medicine.

 

"During the Civil war he joined the army and held high positions during a number of campaigns. After the war he practiced in St. Louis and later in California. At sixty-nine years of age, Dr. Dalton sustained a severe injury through accident that made him less active of body in later years; but his mind never wavered even at an age when the allotted span of life is over, and those who survive it usually fall into second childhood.

 

"His papers on various medical branches and on hypnotism were sought by prominent periodicals. Dr. Dalton was born in North Carolina, his ancestors being among men of national fame, and heroes of the Revolutionary war. One of them, Col. Hunter, was so much a thorn in the side of the British that a price was placed on his head.

 

"Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton leaves a son in San Diego, his daughter, Mrs. Alexander Smith, and grandchildren. He leaves six children. One grandson, Hunter Dalton, resides in Seattle. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at Trinity church at two o'clock. Interment in Tacoma cemetery. Family residence 304 N. 11th St., Tacoma, Wash.

 

This obituary notice was furnished us by Mrs. P. B. Kennedy (Bettie D. Kennedy), "Daltonia Farms," Houstonville, North Carolina, R. F. D. No. 1. Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton was an elder brother of the father of Airs. P. B. Kennedy.

 

Children of Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton and His Wife, Jane Martin Henderson are:

 

A. H. Dalton, of North Carolina.

Mrs. Mary Lou Brodnax, of New York, who died in London England.

Capt. H. H. Dalton, of St . Louis, Mo.

R. H. Dalton, of San Diego, Cal.

Dr. H. C. Dalton, of St. Louis, Mo.

Dr. W. R. Dalton, North Carolina.

 

Robert P. Dalton, of Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Va., who was reared near the old Dalton place in Rockhingam county, North Carolina, tells us that Beaver Island, the home of Samuel Dalton, son of Samuel of Mayo, is still in possession of the family. This place was always in possession of some one by the name of Dalton until the death of Lea Dalton, father of Mrs. John Price, the present owner (1913). Mrs. Price was the only child of L. Dalton.

 

Beaver Island was a part of the estate of Samuel of Mayo. It was about four miles from the residence of Samuel Dalton (1699 1802), and was the home of his son, Samuel, who lived and died there; his son, Samuel, Jr., lived and died there also; and his son Nicholas, lived and died there; and his son, Leander, lived and died there. Leander had only one child, a daughter, who married John H. Price.

 

Beaver Island is now the home of John H. Price and family (1911), the place having been in the Dalton family for six generation.

 

Mr. R. P. Dalton, when questioned in regard to his family, said, "We are scattered from Dan to Bersheba. or rather from London to Los Angeles, and it is very hard to get together even in a book." He had seen the old graveyard at "Hughesville," in Patrick county, Va., where Col. Archelaus Hughes and his wife, Mary Dalton, and many others of the family are buried. Some of the older members of the Dalton family are buried near the Seuratown mountain in Stokes county, N. C. The old Dalton home on Mayo river is about ten miles from "Hughesville," in Patrick county, Va.

 

Some of the vast landed estate of Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, is still in the hands of his descendants. "Daltonia Farms," an estate of about five thousand acres, is the home of Mrs. Bettie (Dalton) Kennedy, near Houstonville, N. C. "Hughesville," in Patrick county, Va., formerly the home of his daughter, Mary Dalton Hughes, is still owned by a descendant.

 

As a family they like to preserve traditions. Miss Ada Dalton, of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, who descends from the Dandridge- Custis family on the maternal side, and through the Dandridge on the paternal side, helps to preserve traditions. Ethel Dalton, a daughter of R. P. Dalton, on graduation from college, had a watch presented her bearing the Dalton crest. Descendants of Samuel Dalton, of Mayo, in Williamson county, Tenn., of the Henderson and Harrison branches have family coat-of-arms framed and hanging on their walls. We are mindful of what William E. Gladstone said: "No greater calamity can befall a people than to break utterly with their past." Mrs. Ciddie Sparrow Dalton (Mrs. Frank Dalton) of Greensboro, North Carolina, uses a die. The Henderson, Harrison, and Briggs branches in Tennessee and the Todhunter family in Missouri have a family die.

 

Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) first met Anne Dandridge Redd, whom he later married, at Williamsburg, Virginia, when Williamsburg was the center of social life. Here had been founded William and Mary College in 1693. This, next to Harvard, is the oldest of American colleges. An institution of learning always gives tone to society. Besides, Williamsburg was at this time the capital of Virginia, and was through winter months the resort of Virginia planters.

 

We will give a partial genealogy of Samuel Dalton's, of Mayo, branch. We are sorry not to be able to give complete genealogy:

 

Generation I in America: William Dalton.

 

Generation II—Samuel Dalton (1699-1802), of Mayo, married Anne Dandridge Redd in 1740.

Robert Dalton, whose children settled in Kentucky. 


John Dalton (1722-1777), of Alexandria, Va. 

 

Generation III—Children of Samuel Dalton (1699-1802) and his wife, Anne Dandridge Redd:

 

David; lived in Stokes county, N. C

Samuel; 1ived in Rockingham county, N. C.

Robert; 1ived in Campbell county, N. C.

William; lived in Virginia.

John; lived in North Carolina,

Mary; born 1748; married Col . Archelaus Hughes; lived in Pat- nek county, Va.

Letitia; born May 15, 1742; married Col. Matthew Moore in 1757; lived in Stokes county, N. C. She died Feb. 22, 1838.

Rachel; married Capt. (and Rev.) William Martin; lived first in Pittsylvania county, Va., later on Snow Creek, N. C.

Jane; married Major Joseph Winston of Stokes county, N. C.

Matilda; married Capt. Jonathan Hanby, March 24, 1769; lived some years in Charleston, S. C.

 

Generation IV—Children of David Dalton: Isaac, Jonathan, David.

 

This branch of the family were all wealthy. Isaac Dalton was vastly rich, and was an elegant gentleman. He often represented his county in the legislature. They Eved in Stokes county, N. C. Jonathan moved to Tennessee to live.

 

Children of Samuel Dalton III: Nicholas; lived at Beaver Island, Rockingham county, North Carolina, where his father and grandfather had lived.

 

John; moved to Tennessee.

William; lived cm the Mississippi river. He became wealthy.

Samuel, IV.; married a Miss Scales, lived in Rockingham county, K. C. Ewefl; lived in Mississippi with his brother, William.

Mary; married a Mr. Harbor; and lived in Louisiana. They were wealthy people.

Elizabeth; married Vaul Martin, of Surry county, N. C.

Nancy; married Absolem Scales, moved to Tennessee.

 

Generation V—Madison Dalton, son of John Dalton, who moved to Tennessee, married a sister of Meredith P. Gentry.

 

Madison Datton, son of Samuel and his wife, Scales, lived in Louisiana.

 

Nicholas, of Beaver Island, had seven sons and five daughters. His son, Leander Dalton, lived at Beaver Island, N. C. One of his daughters married Cardwell, and they were parents of Judge

Richard Cardwell, Nicholas was the father of James, Robert Hunter, P. H., and another who was the grandfather of W. W. Gladstone. Most of the five daughters and seven sons of Nicholas Dalton, of Beaver Island, left large families.

 

Generation VI—This generation comes Mrs. John H Price, of Beaver Island, Rockingham county, N. C., a daughter of Leander Dalton. Rev. P. H. Dalton had a son, Robert Frank Dalton, of Greensboro, N. C, who married Caddie Sparrow. Jas. had a son, Nicholas Dalton. In this generation is Judge Richard Cardwell, of Hanover C. H., Va.

 

Generation VII—In this generation is Mary Louise Dalton, St. Louis; Robert P. Dalton, son of Nicholas, lives at Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Va.; W. W. Gladstone lives in Danville, Va.; C. J. Price lives in Los Angeles, Cal.

 

Generation VIII—In this generation is Major J. W. Dalton, son of Robert P. Dalton. Hunter Dalton, of Seattle, is a grandson of Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton (1806-1900), born in North Carolina and died in Tacoma, Washington. J. W. Dalton has a son Lawrence.

 

Children of R. P. Dalton, of Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Va.

 

R. L. Dalton, San Antonio, Texas.

Major J. W. Dalton, Winston-Salem, N. C.

Ethel Duiton.

Robert Frank Dalton, son of Rev. P. H. Dalton, is president of a large lumber company in High Point, the largest manufacturing plant there. He stands at the head of the business world in his community. His home is in Greensboro, North Carolina. He was educated at Bingham School and Davidson College. His father was a Presbyterian minister.

 

Mr. Dalton married Miss Caroline Fowle Sparrow. They have two sons, Carter Dalton and Thomas Sparrow Dalton.

 

Carter Dalton was known in school for brilliant scholarship. He graduated from the High School with first honors and won the State University Scholarship. He studied law at the State University, after graduation, and then attended Harvard Law School, where he took his degree. He afterwards practiced law in Greensboro for two years, then moving to High Point he became a partner of Mr. Westcott H. Robinson. The Robinson-Dalton law firm is eminently successful. He was elected to the Legislature in 1918; but refused reelection because he wanted to devote his time to law practice. He married Mary Drew Land and has three children: Mary Drew, Caddie Sparrow, and Frank, Jr.

 

Thomas Sparrow Dalton is a man of winning personality. He is beloved by all who come in contact with him, regardless of position or color. Dalton was educated at Bingham School and at the State University at Chapel Hill. Here he was a star on the football team. He married Elizabeth Landon of New York State and has one child, Caroline Landon Dalton. His home is in Wilkes county. It is a palatial residence, made very beautiful by shrubbery, flowers, terraces, and fountains. His apple orchards are far-famed, known as "Gold Medal Orchards," the largest in Wilkes county, Va. Samuel W. Williams served as Attorney-General for the state of Virginia, being elected in 1907 to this office. Gen. Williams is also a descendant of Mary (Dalton) Hughes (1748-1841).

 

Children of Robin Sayers and His Wife, Nancy Crockett are:

 

Sallie Elliot.

David.

Mary Beatty.

Crockett.

 

James Scales Dalton, son of Samuel A. Dalton and his wife, Mary Scales, was born not many miles from Madison, in Rockingham county. North Carolina, Aug. 1, 1835. At the beginning of the Civil war he enlisted and helped organize a company of infantry from Rockingham county, being later elected Lieutenant, and finally Captain. This was known as Company G., 45th North Carolina regiment. He served with honor and distinction at the Battle of Malvern Hill and at the Battle of the Wilderness besides other engagements. He was taken prisoner at the Battle of the Wilderness, and was imprisoned at Fort Delaware, where he remained until the close of the war.

 

After the war James Dalton settled at Reidsville, North Carolina, where for many years he was engaged in the manufacture of tobacco

 

He married Maggie Reid, a daughter of John J. Reid and Margaret Winchester Reid, on Jan. 28, 1875, and lived in Reidsville, N. C., until his death in 1906. They had three children, Maggie Reid Dalton, who was born in Reidsville, Feb. 14, 1876; James S. Dalton, born Feb. 28, 1878; and William Reid Dalton, born July 20, 1884.

 

James S. Dalton, born Feb. 24, 1878, died at Reidsville in 1904. He was never married. He was educated at Reidsville and at Oak Ridge Institute in Guilford county, N. C.

 

William Reid Dalton, son of James S. Dalton and his wife, Maggie Reid, was educated at Reidsville and at the University of North Carolina. Here he was an academic student until his brother's death in 1904. At that time he returned home. He worked in the insurance office of Mr. Francis Womack, of Reidsville, until January, 1909, when he returned to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he commenced a course in law. In the Spring of 1910 he passed successfully the examinations of the University Law School as well as those of the Supreme Court of North Carolina at Raleigh, and was admitted to the practice of law in 1910. He settled in his home town of Reidsville, N. C., where he at once formed a co-partnership with Mr. Julius Johnston oYanceyville, N. C., and Mr. Allen D. Ivie of Leaksville, N. C., for the practice of law under the firm name of "Johnston, Ivie & Dalton" which continued until the death of Mr. Johnston in 1914, after which William Reid Dalton practiced alone. He has served as City Attorney for several years, and he is local counsel for the Southern Railway Company since 1910.

 

And now folks to be fair to all the Dalton researchers on this subject, I will copy a letter from Louis Dalton he posted on the Rootsweb forum:

 

"As far as can be reliably determined by the best Dalton researchers over the last century or so, the story of the Dalton brothers coming from Yorkshire and landing in New Jersey is pure myth. Lucy Henderson Horton, a descendant of Samuel of Mayo, wrote a family history back in 1916-1920 or so. She picked up the story (or created it--no way to know), and the story is often
repeated in Samuel of Mayo's lines. It is claimed that one brother was William who settled in Gloucester and was the father of Samuel of Mayo.

 

A second brother was supposedly John Dalton who settled in Fairfax Co., went into business with John Carlyle and was a part of the founding of Alexandria, Virginia. A third brother vanished into thin air in Maryland.

No one has been able to find any evidence to support any of this. They have searched the historical societies, genealogical societies, churches, county court houses, and state archives in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York and elsewhere to no avail. While they continue to seek; they have yet to find the documentation (will, deed, court proceeding,
Bible, church roll, census record, tithe (tax) list) that would tell us the relationship between these Dalton's."

 

A pretty tough statement. You be the judge!

 

And so this ends this part of the Lancashire, Yorkshire, Virginia, USA connection of the Dalton family.

 

 

 

 

THE END